Posts from May 25, 2005

The fruits of fame

The fruits of fame

: I change my career and get publicity and blog but what really impressed a (soon-to-be-former) coworker of mine is that I got a shout-out from Amanda Congdon.

Moving

Moving

: Dean Wright, Merrill Brown’s successor as editor of MSNBC.com (who has done a good job there), is moving over to Reuters to head up development of its consumer services — that is, news directly to us, not through client media outlets. As we ask how we’re going to get commodity news in the future, this is one answer. The AP will have a different answer — pulling together the news of its correspondents and members. I’m not sure which model will be better business.

The future of magazines?

The future of magazines?

: Mark Glaser has a roundtable discussion about the future of magazines with Jay Rosen, Joan Walsh, Nina Link, Samir Husni, David Abrahamson and me.

: Also, Heather Green called this weekend for a chat that ends up on her Business Week blog. I rambled (not thinking it’d end up as a transcript) but rambling is nothing unusual for me!

Mˆtley suit

Mˆtley suit

: Motley

is suing NBC for banning them after Vince Neal used the F word:

In the latest twist in the broadening battle overdecency standards, the glam-metal band Mˆtley Cr¸e filed suit against NBC yesterday. The suit states that the network violated the group’s free-speech rights and weakened its sales by banning it after Vince Neil, the lead singer, used an expletive on the air in a Dec. 31 appearance on “The Tonight Show.”

The lawsuit, filed in a federal court in Los Angeles, accuses the network of censoring the band to mollify a Federal Communications Commission that has been increasingly quick to levy steep fines for broadcasting indecent material on television and radio.

Well, too bad that the suit’s absurd. NBC choses what to put and not put on the air — it’s called editing or producing, not censoring. Now I suppose one could argue that it’s not their air, it’s our air, so the band could sue to get on — but, of course, that’s ludicrous; that would end in every American getting 15 minutes of fame. Or I suppose the band could sue the FCC for creating this chill — except the FCC didn’t fine FCC and, besides, the F came out in the “safe harbor” for nastiness after 10 p.m. Still, I’m glad to see anybody go tilting against the windmill (read: broadcast tower) that is the FCC.

Behind the silence

Behind the silence

: I have two incredibly stupid reasons for the radio silence here: (1) I’m doing too many months’ worth of expense accounts, (2) I’m cleaning too many piles of old memoes out of my office. But it has to get done (here’s why). I’ll be back in a bit.