Posts from October 28, 2004

Please, no

Please, no

: NBC and ABC are each making miniseries based on the 9/11 Commission report.

Please, no.

There are so many reasons not to:

It’s too soon.

It’s exploitive.

It’s another effort to enshrine the 9/11 Commission report as gospel. It isn’t.

There hasn’t been a decent miniseries in decades and the thought of turning this national tragedy into network kitsch is unbearable. From one story:

Yost, who also created and executive produced the NBC police drama “Boomtown” and worked on the elaborate HBO miniseries “From the Earth to the Moon” and “Band of Brothers,” acknowledged that he had taken on a highly ambitious project that would take at least a year to research and develop. Most of the specifics about the project, including the number of hours, narrative approach and how it would be scheduled, have yet to be hammered out.

“I know I’ll be crying every day that I work on this,” Yost said. “It’s an incredibly emotional story and an incredibly compelling story. It’s an incredible honor and a responsibility, and I don’t take it lightly, but it is one that I am eager to take on.”

From another:

NBC Entertainment prexy Kevin Reilly said he wanted to create a “cultural event” for TV in the vein of “Roots” and “The Day After.”

You offensive twit, 9/11 already is a “cultural event.” We don’t need a network to make it that.

The future of blogs

The future of blogs

: Go read the rest of Glenn Reynolds good two-part column on the future of blogs.

The Daily Stern: FCC assignment desk

The Daily Stern: FCC assignment desk

: I put in a Freedom of Information request to the FCC asking to get the whopping 159 complaints that led them to decree that Fox had corrupted America by suggesting sex on its Married by America. I have heard no reply.

I’m serious, FCC. I’m a reporter, too. I want to see those “complaints.” I expect I’ll find more work by Xerox than by the citizenry.

On Stern this morning, he raised another good story: Michael Powell said during Stern’s phone call with him that the FCC had investigated and found Viacom to be in some conspiracy with Janet Jackson to expose her breast. But Janet Jackson said she did this on her own. So why is Viacom being fined and not Jackson? If there is no proof of this conspiracy, then the FCC’s fine is clearly a punitive political action, not the result of regulatory investigation.

So a good reporter should file an FOI request for the investigation files on the Janet Jackson case.

And while you’re at it, file an FOI request for the complaints against Stern and Jackson. Here I know you will find that they come from only a few sources with a lot of Xeroxing. It’s not the people standing up as one — hell, it’s a tiny proportion of people in any case — but instead an organized pressure group.

Is it government’s job to respond to every pressure group with a Xerox machine? If so, the libertarians should be about ready to dismantle government by now. And Area 51 should be opened. And we’d be out of the UN….

These are good stories. Any real reporters out there?

Podcasting

Podcasting

: Feedburner has started a service to create Podcast feeds. Which is nice… except I don’t understand it. Step-by-step, please.

Glass blogs

Glass blogs

: I hate it when I think of the right answer after the TV lights are off. Last night on Capitol Report, John Hinderaker went on about how The New York Times is a front for the Kerry campaign and then said the difference between him as a blogger and big media is that he gets his facts right. He repeated it again. And what I should have said is: John, don’t make the same mistake The Times — and 60 Minutes and the rest of big media — make, acting as if you get everything right, putting yourself up on a pedestal. For it’s a mighty steep fall off it.