Posts from October 20, 2004

The real game

The real game

: The best replay I heard of last night’s amazing Yankees/Sox game (not that I tend to hear much sports, mind you) was Artie Lang regaling the Stern show this morning with tales of the angry, drunken, desperate Yankee fans in the stands. That’s what we need: coverage from the stands, from the fan’s eyes, not from the dehumidified, dehumanized confines of a broadcast booth.

My, my

My, my

: The minor dustup between Glenn Reynolds and Tony Pierce over blogger bias that began playing itself out here (and here, then here and here) has been covered and quoted extensively by Howard Kurtz in the Washington Post today. Glenn responds here to Andrew Sullivan’s criticism here about lacking fire: “I’ve actually tried quite consciously to moderate my tone in the run-up to the elections, because I think that there’s quite enough abuse out there.” I’ve noticed that lately on Instapundit and I’ve been damned glad to see it. Actually, I think Glenn has returned to his natural self, having banished the angry Glenn with a few stiff drinks.

Loonitarians

Loonitarians

: Weblogs are the best thing to happen to the libertarian cause since its beginning. Libby bloggers — and I’m still not sure why there are disproporportional number of them — have done a great job spreading their worldview and making sense of it. They have advanced their cause admirably.

But this morning, I hear an NPR story about Libertarian candidate Michael Badnarik and it consigns libertarians right back into the looney bin: Their candidate thinks driver’s licenses are unconstitutional, the report says, and so Badnarik makes it a point to get arrested for driving without a license whenever he can to prove his alleged point. This is exactly the image libertarians had for years: impractical, obnoxious loons.

I suggest that the libertarian bloggers band together and take over their party, for they are, in fact, their party’s best hope: Hold the first online convention, a national internet primary to pick your next candidate. Run some sane people with libby leanings (Reynolds, Volokh, Gillespie, et al). And continue to have sane discussion of issues from your perspective to add into the national debate. And get rid of the loonies.

: A libby discussion ensues thanks to Matt Welch over at Hit & Run.

What we need is a Friars’ Club for the internet

What we need is a Friars’ Club for the internet

: I got an email pitch from Always On to join up and pay up for the priviliege of getting its print magazine and getting discounts to its events. And that was fine — if hauntingly familiar — so far. But then I read on to the pitch for the first event:

As an example, all AO Insiders will be invited to a members-only Churchill

Club affair on November 9th for the Top 10 Trends in Technology Debate,

featuring John Doerr of Kleiner Perkins and Bono’s new investment partner,

Roger McNamee. You will also be invited to the Yahoo campus on December 8th

to watch my live interview with Chief Yahoo Jerry Yang at a private dinner

for 300 insiders.

Web 2.0 ruined the appeal of that. John Doerr was an utter ass on stage, refusing to answer questions, playing coy for no reason, revealing nothing, boring the audience. And Jerry Yang, though a terribly nice guy, really has nothing new to say. Reverential interviews and panel discussions with these guys won’t get a dollar from me. On the other hand, what if we started a Friars’ Club for online with roasts of them (and a few others I can nominate). Now that would be entertaining.

Stewart redux

Stewart redux

: CNET writes about Jon Stewart and CNN and quotes this very blog on why CNN should have put the clip out there for all to see and send along. (It’s funny seeing a quote written in blogspeak puilled out in a news story; it looks like a kid in jeans at the prom.)

I’ll be on Brian Lehrer’s show on WNYC this morning at 11 on the same topic. I hope to tell NPR that they should be cutting up all their shows into bit to allow the audience to distribute them (with sponsor underwriter messages and begging pledge pitches attached). Viral, audience, BitTorrent/RSS distribution of their programming would explode the audience for NPR — and be damned convenient for their fans. NPR should fuel podcasting. At this point, most NPR affiliates won’t allow most NPR programming even onto satellite. But WNYC could lead the way with its best show, Lehrer’s.

: Oh, my, the CNET quotes look even nicer under a New York Times logo.