Posts from August 30, 2004

From the streets

From the streets

: Getting ready for tomorrow night’s PS122 blog panel (ok, it’s another plug), I’m reading across fellow panelists blogs. Go to the blog of John Perry Barlow (the dancing protestor) for an entertaining report from the bike protest and a report on a resurgence of cocaine, the Republican drug, in New York. Go to Hit & Run for much good reporting, including Julian Sanchez’ fun report on flash mobs getting carried away with themselves. And go to Gothamist for lots of reports from fellow blogs.

One thing voters of all parties can agree upon:

One thing voters of all parties can agree upon:

: Mimes and clowns are scary. Political mimes and clowns are also hard to take. [via Gothamist]

Come to my blogging panel… please!

Come to my blogging panel… please!

: OK, here’s the last plug for Tuesday night’s blogging panel at PS122 in New York.

It’s a stellar bunch and we just signed up Jay Rosen (my first choice in the first place). Ana Marie Cox had to drop out; Jay’s not as pretty but he gives great panel. The rest of the panel: Douglas Rushkoff , Jen Chung of Gothamist, political blogging vet Cam Barrett, Julian Sanchez of Reason’s Hit and Run, John Aravosis of AmericaBlog, and the legendary John Perry Barlow .

Click here to buy tickets (no, I don’t get a cut… I need a new agent… hell, I need an agent).

It’s at 7 p.m. Tuesday and here’s how to get there: P.S. 122 is located at 150 First Ave. on the corner of E. 9th St., near the 1st Ave. stop on the “L” Train, the Astor Place stop on the 6 Train, the 8th st. stop on the N/R line and the 2nd Ave. stop on the F train.

Please also leave questions and topics for discussion in the comments here.

The space is the substance

The space is the substance

: Jay Rosen has an interesting post (of course) analyzing the space of the conventions: the RNC, with the folksy Bush among the people in the round… vs. the DNC, with Kerry up in the command podium, saluting… vs. the people on Seventh Avenue. (And he disagrees with me about the anachronistic nature of demonstrations.)

Doesn’t the public know what is in the public’s interest?

Doesn’t the public know what is in the public’s interest?

: Gawd, I cannot abide Michael J. Copps, the Democratic member of the FCC and the one most likely to tear down both the free marketplace of both ideas and commerce.

Today, he writes an op-ed in The Times that perfectly illustrates his nannyfied philosophy of government: He knows what we should know, he knows what we shouldn’t hear hear, he wants to take care of us … even if we don’t want anybody to take care of us.

Copps argues that the networks should be airing the political conventions because we, the people own the airwaves and lend them to the networks, airing the conventions is in the public interest.

Well, let’s examine those assumptions:

First, is it in the public interest to air the conventions? Well, I’d say that the public is in the best position to judge what is in its interest … and the public doesn’t watch conventions! So who the hell are you, Copps, to tell us what is in our interest?

Second, you assume that there is value in watching the conventions. But as we all know, no news happens there. They are merely overlong commercials that give absolutely no real sense of what the politicians and parties are all about. So what is the public good in airing them besides giving your politician buddies face time on TV?

This from the same guy who would fine Howard Stern off the air — telling his milions of listeners that they should be listening to him, just because Copps says so — and who would give government a role in deciding who cannot own broadcast outlets and thus who cannot have free speech.

Copps: Those are our airwaves, not yours.