Posts from August 10, 2004

World Trade Center health registry

World Trade Center health registry

: More than 50,000 people have now signed up for the World Trade Center health registry. I’ve signed up. If you were there, so should you.

Reuters’ agenda

Reuters’ agenda

: John Kerry and answered George Bush’s question on the war, saying that he would still have authorized the war in Iraq, even knowing there were no WMDs there. Of course, he says he would have used that authorization differently if he had been president.

I say that was the stand-up thing to do. Kerry knows it won’t be popular with his corps — it could even send some running to Nader — but he said what he would do and didn’t back away. I respect him for that.

Reuters today does the followup with Bush still trying to tweak Kerry — fruitlessly, in my view — and here’s the headline:

“Bush Goes After Kerry on Iraq War Admission”

Admission is an awfully loaded word — as in, Kerry admits he would support the war Reuters opposes.

Help bring free speech to Iran: Click here

Help bring free speech to Iran: Click here

: Iranian blog pioneer Hossein Derakhshan’s blog is being blocked by Iran’s mullahs. His only way around this — until technology geniuses invent incredibly clever ways to foil censors — is to buy new domains. So click here and go help him buy some.

Do not bend

jarvisstamp.jpgDo not bend

: Stamps.com got final approval to let you use your own photos to create stamps.

Not a nation divided, just a nation deafened

Not a nation divided, just a nation deafened

: I’ve been saying for sometime that we are not a nation divided — that’s just how media and politicians want to portray us because it fits their agendas. The truth is that we all have lives; they don’t. So they spend their time shouting at us, deafening us. But they don’t represent us.

I’m not alone in this view. In this week’s Time, Joe Klein says it’s “only the blabocrats”:

We are a divided nation, it is said. There is a cultural chasm between the red states and the blue, between the religious and the secular, between Michael Moore’s America and Rush Limbaugh’s. The “culture war” has become a pillar of the conventional wisdom. But is it real? Is it possible that the great partisan divide is a media-induced mirage, little more than an exaggerated case of squeaky-wheelism? There is plenty of evidence that the very real disputes pushed by political activists and chair-throwing media yakkers