Posts from March 9, 2004

My life, my blog

My life, my blog
: Neil McIntosh has a fascinating glimpse of a Nokia blogging application (not yet for the Web, foolishly) that captures all the content you produce on the road — photos, SMS, video — and turns it into a lifeblog.

Good riddance

Good riddance
: We are better off to be rid of him:

Abu Abbas, the leader of the Palestinian group that hijacked the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro in 1985 and killed a U.S. citizen, died in U.S. custody yesterday, a U.S. Defense Department official said.

They love us, they really love us

They love us, they really love us
: Soccer moms love the Internet, according to a study done for Disney [via Adrants]:

Eighty-four percent of mothers who use the Internet said that if they had to give up one type of media, they would miss the Internet more than any other source of information or entertainment…

Among the study’s other key findings: Moms now use the Internet almost twice as much as they watch TV, spending a total of 13.2 hours a week online versus 7.6 per week for TV. They use the Internet primarily as an information resource (86 percent placing it well ahead of TV and newspapers), secondarily as a source of entertainment (63 percent), and thirdly as an activity to engage their kids (43 percent).

The Internet outranks TV, radio, and magazines as a trusted source of information. Only newspapers were ranked higher, and then, only by 3 percent….

Blog fight!

Blog fight!
: The Denton/Calacanis Gizmodo/Engadget blog fight is picking up steam. Denton yesterday offered a transparent view of what happened. Today, in the comments here, Calacanis pulls a bitchslap in return:

Nick plays down the business of blogs for one reason: to pay people less. Trust me, Nick is not doing blogs just for the fun of it, or because he loves the medium. He is hiring people, putting up tons of google ad words, and spending money on expensive logos for a reason: he wants to make money. If he just wanted to do blogs for fun he would post to his personal blog and not be doing highly targeted, highly- profitable (read: porn and gadget) verticals.

That being said, there is nothing wrong with making this into a business. Who wouldn’t want to work from home blogging and make a living?! Nick is a great businessman and he is going to be very, very successful and I commend him, even if we have different styles.

But the real fight won’t occur at this level (it’s like reporting on a fight to get a new general manager at your TV station… who the hell cares?). The real fight will occur on the products. And Denton is upping the ante there; today, he had Cory Doctorow empty his gadget bag; that kind of original reporting from a lifestyle perspective will make Gizmodo more compelling and readable. Competition is good, eh?

Shorter is smarter

Shorter is smarter
: Halley Suitt has a post today about trying to teach people to blog and how it’s hard to convince them that most times, shorter is better. She was nice enough to link to a brief list of bloggers who usually keep it short (I’m disproving that today, though) and she emailed them all for their thoughts. Fascinating discussion ensued.

Dave Winer pointed to Lisa Williams’ post that compares Chinese and Western cooking and the division of labor (in China, the chef cuts the steak; here, we have to) to the growth of RSS (in old media, the editor cuts the steak for us; in a feed world, we the readers get to decide how to slice and dice it).

Cory Doctorow says he thinks of a post as — I love this — writing the nut graf, lede, and dek on a news story.

I like that so much because I think it captures the essence of the post-Internet newspaper or news property: It’s a better service to give people the lead and then let them link to depth if they want it.

The problem is that short gets a bad rep and rap. I think I’ve told this before, but I’ll tell it again: At People and Entertainment Weekly, when I started grading shows, fellow critics scolded me: “People won’t read your reviews; they’ll just read the grade.” And I said: So? If that’s all they want, then it is the ultimate in service and brevity to tell them what they want to know with just one letter.