Posts from March 6, 2004

Passion follies

Passion follies
: An elementary school teacher shows sixth-grade students scenes from a pirated copy of Mel Gibson’s Passion. He is suspended, as well he should be.

Bush on the Bush ads

Bush on the Bush ads
: Bush will not pull his ads with 9/11 scenes. This is pretty much already in the nonissue column. I linked to a few liberal bloggers who weren’t upset and I’m seeing more who feel the same. Says Bush:

Comment civility

Comment civility
: People: I will not tolerate personal attacks on each other (or me), nor the seven dirty words (because I don’t want this site blocked) and I most certainly will not tolerate bigoted hate speech. When I see any of those things, I am taking to killing all comments I see by that person and not wasting time seeing which comments are OK and which are not. So behave or get out. Period. These comments are open so that we can have a civil, mature, productive, and pleasant exchange of ideas and views. We can disagree. We can disagree strongly. But no one should act like an ass. This is my house. Be nice or be gone. Note that I will also kill comments that I think are just too dumb or off-topic to live. See the Rules of Engagement at right.

‘Read it. Discuss it.’

‘Read it. Discuss it.’
: The Guardian gives high praise to Tony Blair’s speech on terrorism, telling readers to read the speech and discuss it.

But it is a very serious speech, intellectually demanding and carefully expressed throughout most of its length, about an indisputably big, difficult and complex subject. It is a speech worthy of its subject, and it deserves the respectful attention of all who take politics seriously. At a time when politics is widely felt to be so disreputable, that is no small achievement. It deserves an appropriately respectful and thoughtful response that goes beyond attitudinising.

The Telegraph calls it “an eloquent case for going to war.” Even The Independent praises the speech as “one of the most substantial and genuine of his premiership.”

This is what it feels like to have an eloquent statesman as a leader.

: UPDATE: The Observer chimes in, too:

But his central argument, which we fully support, was that, given the nature of the terrorist threat, it should not have been so hard to find political legitimacy for action. The threat of terrorism, he argued, requires the international community to be able to use pre-emptive force. Again, we support this view.

The US has shown itself woefully unprepared for Iraq’s reconstruction, but that does not undermine the Prime Minister’s crucial point. Terrorism does represent a new threat and it does require new responses. The international laws that served us in the aftermath of the Second World War are overdue for reform. Mr Blair will not silence his critics by describing them as ‘cynics’ – they are not – but his call for a new world compact based on shared international beliefs and interests is a vision that supporters and critics alike should support.

More ballot stuffing

More ballot stuffing
: And here’s another online poll you can go and manipulate. [via LGF]