Posts from January 28, 2004

Denial

Denial
: There’s pathetic denial going on in certain circles over the Hutton verdict. The Independent (surprise!) says, “Hutton is accused of a ‘whitewash.'” Tee-hee.

Big smoking gun

Big smoking gun
: The Smoking Gun teams up with NBC News. [via LostRemote]

Headline of the day

Headline of the day
: Trippi’s firing according to Kaus: “Beltway 1, Blog 0”

Blogging the blog king

Blogging the blog king
: I’m at Columbia now, awaiting a Nick Denton talk with Oliver Ryan. Nick’s not happy that I parked myself by the electric socket. “You’re not going to blog this, are you?” Live by the snark, die by the snark…

Nick tells the journalism students that he doesn’t look for journalists to write his blogs. He likes to get people when they haven’t been destroyed by working in a big paper….

Student asks how Nick squares his view that daily American papers are boring with his admission that blogs are parasitic on big media, linking to the content they create. Nick says, “Why do I have to square it.” That is what a Nick conversation is like.

Student tries to get Nick up on a soap box. Nick replies, “We feel no public-service responsibility.”

Student: “If it’s so boring why are so many bloggers media addicts?” Nick: “They’re hypocritical.”

Nick punctures pomposity with aplomb….

A new political blog

A new political blog
: David Weinberger has started a new Corante blog: Loose Democracy. I’m way looking forward to reading this because Weinberger is one of the smartest and most candid yet humble people in this new world. In his first post, he rebuts Clay Shirky:

We do have a couple of indisputable facts: Dean came in a poor third in Iowa and a disappointing second in New Hampshire. But this by itself leads to no conclusions about whether social software hurt the campaign. For all we know, Dean would still be in single digits as an ex-governor of the Maple Sugar state if the online connection hadn’t happened. And we certainly don’t know that, if social software failed, it was because it lulled participants into a sense of “inevitability.” That’s just Clay’s speculation.

My earlier comment on this here. See especially Jack Balkin‘s analysis there.