Posts from November 2003

Uh-oh

Pew

Uh-oh
: The Pew Internet & American Life center releases no end of great, if sometimes frightening, studies of the online us. Take a look at this chart from the latest, which looks at the technology and media consumption of relatively techy segments of the population. They asked which of these media it would be “hard to give up.”

Note poor ol’ print down at the bottom of the list. Most would sooner give up newspapers and magazines than PDAs.

With that in mind, read the post below this…

: UPDATE: Tom Mangan, in the comments, says this is apples/kumquat comparison. Fair enough. Also note that the PDA question was asked only of people who have PDAs; the people who don’t have them would give them up easily. Still, I was depressed at the low number of people who would find it hard to give up their newspaper. That’s the sad part.

Interact

Interact
: Andrew Nachison, director of The Media Center, scolds journalism “pros” for dismissing and dissing weblogs and interactivity. Go get ’em, Andrew:

I

Aren’t we cute

Aren’t we cute
: All Things Considered airs your basic condescending report on blogs and presidential candidates tonight. The only thing they quote from Dean’s comments is somebody giving the candidate sartorial advice. They give blogs the back-handed compliment of being “cool” (how frigging ’90s). They dismissively say that blogs don’t have a big audience. They don’t get it: This is not another computer game. It’s the people — the audience, the voters, the citizens — talking. Wanna listen, NPR? Try reading some. [Here’s the link to listen.]

: Ed Cone’s growling about it, too.

: Update: Two commenters point out the tasty irony of NPR dismissing any medium for having a small audience.

Correction

Correction
: The Pentagon denies reports that the soldiers killed in Mosul did not have their throats slit and were not pummeled by a crowd. They were shot and killed and robbed. But now Atrios may not see a bad sign.

Payday

Payday
: Parade (full disclosure: it’s part of my company) is working on its annual income surveya and went to John Scalzi to find out what bloggers make. Boy, is that a straight line.