Posts from September 2003

The people of the dust: Register now

The people of the dust: Register now
: Newsday reports that a disappointing 10,000 people have joined the World Trade Center Health Registry.

If you were there on that day or worked there afterwards, please sign up. The more data they gather, the more they know about the health risk to all of us, the more they know about the health risk to any one of us. The data is important. It could save lives by treating illness in time.

The survey is as easy as such a thing can be.

So please register.

Bada-blog

Bada-blog
: I’m so damned proud: NJ.com creates the Soprano’s blog.

No news is bad news

No news is bad news
: In a smart instant essay, Jay Rosen cautions that we shouldn’t fall into the why-does-the-press-report-only-bad-news trap in judging coverage of Iraq (inspired by the USA Today survey of Baghdad correspondents’ weltanschauungs, linked here). He’s right, of course. That stinky herring always haunts the news business. And we should ignore it. It’s our job to report bad news when the news is bad.

But the question about Iraqi coverage is not whether the coverage is too negative or too positive but whether the picture is accurate; that’s the issue. Do reporters have on their Kosovo (read: liberation) or their Vietnam (read: quagmire) glasses? The answer is as loaded as Charlton Heston’s closet.

And Rosen asks another good question that’s all about seeing the bigger problems to cover, the deeper story, the harder questions:

Maybe the complaint is not with covering the problems; it

Blogging the bus

Blogging the bus
: I’m making reservations for Bloggercon next week. Yesterday, someone who’ll remain nameless yelled at me for going. We are a dysfunctional family, we are. I also saw that Dave Winer just put up rules for the conference and the hubris of that idea bothered me until I read them: “All conversations, whether to the entire room or one-to-one, unless otherwise stated, clearly and up front, are on the record and for attribution.” Fine.

But here’s my real travel note:

I’m taking the bus to Boston. But not just any bus: The new Limoliner: Manhattan to Back Bay in four hours on a single seat with high-speed Internet access the whole wayand a DVD movie and a stewardess with snacks and only 28 privileged seats.

I’ll do anything not to fly.

The ombudsman’s ombudsman

The ombudsman’s ombudsman
: Matt Welch has some very funny moments from an ombudsman under attack.