Posts from June 2003

World Stupidity Awards

World Stupidity Awards
: Well, how could I have missed the World Stupidity Awards:

:Stupidest Person in the World – Former Iraqi Information Minster Saeed al-Sahaf.

Stupidest Government in the World – People’s Republic of North Korea

Media Outlet which has made greatest Contribution to Furthering Ignorance Worldwide – CNN

Stupidity Award for Reckless Endangerment of the Planet – U.S. President George W. Bush

Stupidest Trend or form of Mass Hysteria – Humans destroying the planet

Stupidest Film of the Year – Kangaroo Jack

Stupidest Person in Canada – Prime Minister Jean Chretien

Hmmm. If only I’d had the chance to nominate Jacques Chirac as Stupidist Head of State; BBC as Stupidist Network, Canada as Stupidist Former American Ally. Any other nominees?

The original reality show

The original reality show
: The proceedings of the Old Bailey 1714-1759 are online. Now you, too, can look up your apparently felonious ancestors. [via Die Zeit]

Iran auf Deutsch

Iran auf Deutsch
: And now an Iranian weblog auf Deutsch. [via Steppenwolf]

A sermon

A sermon
: My posting has been light the last day or so because I had to finish up a sermon I got dragooned into giving this morning at my little Congregational church in New Jersey.

It was my third sermon out of September 11th: “The first time I stood here, six months after September 11th, I talked about the pain. The second time, on the first anniversary, I talked about the anger. Today, I will talk about the beginning of redemption in three small changes for the good.” It mentions this weblog as well as Hoder‘s and Greg Allen’s. Full text, if you dare, is here.

America and Iran

America and Iran
: L. Bruce Laingen, who was charge d’affaires at the U.S. embassy in Tehran when it was seized by Iranian hostage-takers, writes a column arguing that we shouldn’t get involved in Iran and that it’s not ready for revolution. I wonder what the Iranian bloggers have to say about that; it’s one matter to debate America’s support of the Iranian democracy movement and quite another to debate the existence of that movement.

Regime change in Tehran is inevitable. But it must come from within. Iran is not Iraq. It is big; it is populous: 70 million and counting. It is overwhelmingly Shiite. Its people are culture-proud and intensely nationalistic. The current student unrest is symptomatic, but there is little evidence of a burgeoning public movement sufficient to press revolutionary change. A quasidemocratic process and an evolving civil society work to keep political agitation largely under control, with the Basij and other militants put on the streets to curb student unrest. After the climactic events of the revolution and the eight years of devastating war with Iraq, there is little public readiness for institutional upheaval. Nor is there any evident alternative leadership of any stature among the students or other opposition.

Change will come, but it can and should be “soft” change.