Posts from March 2003

Michael Moore, political arsonist

Michael Moore, political arsonist
: Michael Moore is really going over the edge. Variety reports on his next movie:

The project will depict the allegedly murky relationship between President Bush’s father and the family of Osama bin Laden. And it will suggest that the bin Laden family was greatly enriched by that association.

Moore is making a deal with Mel Gibson’s Icon Prods. to finance “Fahrenheit 911,” a documentary that will trace why the U.S. has become a target for hatred and terrorism. It will also depict alleged dealings between two generations of the Bush and bin Laden clans that led to George W. Bush and Osama bin Laden becoming mortal enemies….

“The primary thrust of the new film is what has happened to the country since Sept. 11, and how the Bush administration used this tragic event to push its agenda,” Moore said. “It certainly does deal with the Bush and bin Laden ties. It asks a number of questions that I don’t have the answers to yet, but which I intend to find out.”…

We all know crisis queens. Moore is a controversy queen.

Double negatives
: I don’t make fun of Moore because he’s against the war. I make fun of him because he’s so make-funnable.

I just found his piece about his Oscar speech in which he argues that the boos weren’t directed against him:

…before I had finished my first sentence about the fictitious president, a couple of men (some reported it was “stagehands” just to the left of me) near a microphone started some loud yelling. Then a group in the upper balcony joined in. What was so confusing to me, as I continued my remarks, was that I could hear this noise but, looking out on the main floor, I didn’t see a single person booing.

But then the majority in the balcony

Saddam’s military strategy: delay

Saddam’s military strategy: delay
: The Scottsman argues that Saddam’s entire strategy is — shades of Vietnam — delaying our progress to make us more unpopular.

Despite the US

Bon temps my ass

Bon temps my ass
: Our correspondent in New Orleans reports much fun over Jacques Chirac down in Louisiana:

It is, if you don’t know, the Louisiana Purchase Bicentennial. On Dec. 20, there is to be a climactic ceremony in Jackson Square, in which Presidents Bush & Chirac are supposed to kiss each other’s cheeks and get all gooshy.

The thought of which sickens good ol’ boys everywhere.

So my boy State Rep. Almond Gaston Crowe, of Crowley, is filing legislation to UN-invite the head Frog from attending the event. Not to be outdone, a credible contender for this year’s governor’s race has jumped on the bandwagon. And yesterday, Gov. Mike “Duckblind” Foster opined on radio that he may beat ’em all to the punch and do it by executive order. We like Mike. The first thing that pops up on the gov’s homepage, in fact, is a poll asking Louisianans about dissing Chirac . . . last I looked, 54 percent want him disinvited. I suspect a high percentage of the other 46 percent is from frantic poll-stuffing by the state tourism board and the Bicentennial Commission, which is freaking out that their premiere event of 2003 is going down in flames.

See the original Times-Picayune story on Nola.com here.

: Update: A French trade delegation canceled a trip to New Orleans next month.

News sources

News sources
: A Magid survey shows where people are going for war news: 45 percent go for to cable news, 22 percent to network news, 20 to local TV news, and 11 to other media.

Where do they go next? Mix up the results above and then the Internet comes above newspapers.

The audience is demanding immediacy. [via Live Remote]

: Meanwhile, 42 percent of viewers in another survey said that war coverage tired them out and 58 percent found it frightening to watch.

: Imagine how many will be frightened by French Network News….

Troop buildup

Troop buildup
: So some are giving Rumsfeld grief for the speed of the troop buildup in Iraq: from 90,000 in week one to 120,000 in week two, to 200,000 in short order.

In Vietnam, it took from 1950 to 1965 to get to 184,000 troops — and, of course, many said that was too damned fast.