iHeaven

We have lost our Gutenberg, Edison, Picasso, Carnegie….*

God Bless you Steve Jobs, for all you gave us, especially your perfection.

* Others have amended my list to include Da Vinci and Michelango.

  • Jeremy

    I appreciate that he was mostly the first three visionaries that you cited, and less the monopolist that Carnegie was. (Written on my MacBook Pro which still looks and works like the slickest piece of computing machinery I’ve ever owned after 2 years of abuse being carted to and from classes.)

  • Landon

    I couldn’t have said it better myself…

  • PSGInfinity

    Steve,
    For all that you were,
    For all that you did,
    And all that your followers can still do,
    Thank You

  • http://www.classroominthefuture.com James

    I spent last night reflecting on how much I missed Steve while struggling to get through the iPhone 4S announcement. :( So sad right now. Thanks for this Jeff.

    -James, aka, the awkward kid who tried to get you into the Google Store the last time you were on campus. We chatted about Chromebooks.)

  • Oliver

    Jeff

    Apple writes its own rules and they are very different to those you espouse. In WWGD, you talk about a culture of beta, while in Public Parts you talk about sharing information in public, having an open conversation during the product development process. I struggle to think of a company that is further from these principles than Apple. What do you think about this contrast?

    • http://www.buzzmachine.com Jeff Jarvis

      Oliver, You’re right and so I posted a snipped about this from WWGD? above.

      • Oliver

        Thanks. Should’ve read the book!

  • http://www.wretch.cc/blog/storyspace ???

  • http://www.wretch.cc/blog/storyspace Vincent

  • Pattie

    Thank you for making me look cool in front of my son.

  • Balun Stormhands

    I’d add Henry Ford, Nicola Tesla, Thomas Edison and The Wright Brothers to that list too.

    He turned a slab of metal and glass, and turned it into magic.

  • Ashley L

    I agree, Steve was a visionary and truly a great man. His passing actually upset me more than I was expecting. His legacy will be emulated for generations to come. I hope his great weath goes to doing great work now that he is gone.

    I do have a but though – sitting below his legacy that changed the face of technology forever, he only really succeeded in getting us to buy more “stuff” and make a lot of money. I’m not anti-capitalism that’s what he did – got us to buy (awesome) stuff. Perhaps a little too cold an analysis.

    Others, like Jeff, make people think. To me, that is more important.

  • Pedro

    Sorry, more like our P.C. Barnum.

  • http://blogs.unpad.ac.id Imam

    His creation device was so amazing. Great idea Steve.

  • G-man

    Can we separate the ‘Good’ Steve, the visionary creator, from the ‘Bad’ Steve, the selfish, greedy, cheapskate, anti-charity, emotionally immature, job-outsourcing, authoritarian, control-freak? He had a chance to create a humane tech company, and he went to the dark side of top-down fear-based empire instead…

  • http://www.diziklip.net dodo

    I appreciate that he was mostly the first three visionaries that you cited, and less the monopolist that Carnegie was. (Written on my MacBook Pro which still looks and works like the slickest piece of computing machinery I’ve ever owned after 2 years of abuse being carted to and from classes

    good answer