Small c update: The hosectomy

It has been a week and a half since my prostate surgery and I’m doing great. I’m walking a couple miles a day (can’t run for a few weeks but even when I do run it’s not running), eating normally, sleeping well, now able to sit and stand and cough and burp without feeling as if I was hit in the belly with a Volkswagen.

I just returned from my hosectomy: the last dread. After everything else one goes through, this is the least of it. But I am damned glad I didn’t know just how long a Foley catheter is; I’m surprised I didn’t choke on it. The nurse fills the bladder with saline, then deflates a balloon also filled with saline (which is what keeps it in), then pulls, and then it’s my job to catch what comes out in a jug. “Just don’t get my shoes wet,” she says, “they’re expensive.” Mission successful. An hour later, I just went to the bathroom for real. Mission successful. Life is good.

But it turns out my pharmacist was wrong: I will be wearing man diapers for a few weeks along with a man pad inside – the belt and suspenders of the urologic trade. I feel as if I’m walking around with a padded codpiece – which is ironic, considering what’s still not going to be happening for awhile in that department.

They tell me it’s going to be a difficult few weeks and then it will start getting better over the next few months. That’s why I’ve canceled trips – that and I am still recuperating. The one thing I heard from people who’ve had my same robotic surgery is that you feel too good and then push it and then regret it. Today’s a case in point: I was determined to go into Manhattan for my class but my wife and my substitute, Steven Johnson, convinced me I was wrong.

Bottom line: The new normal is looking more like the old normal every day. I remain very lucky.

  • http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~mstoll/ Prof. Michael Stoll

    Jeff, as one of your many followers on twitter, i just want to drop this line: it great to see your twitter frequency go up again. a good sign. wishing you all the best and stay tuned! michael.

  • http://twitter.com/MarcelHH MarcelHH

    Jeff, it sounds as if you are back in the business!

    Best Regards
    Marcel

  • http://outside.in Mark Josephson

    Jeff,

    Kudos to you for being so open about your process here. Sure that it will help lots of people looking for hope and info.

    Be well…

  • http://www.natalidelconte.com Natali Del Conte

    Wow, you are very brave! Thanks for keeping us posted, Jeff.

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  • http://smithandsmithpr.co.uk Alison Dwyer

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDhETFcgWTE&feature=PlayList&p=22180CC6A3436368&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=9

    So glad you’re doing well, thought this would make you laugh as I thought about it immediately when you said…”I will be wearing man diapers for a few weeks along with a man pad inside – the belt and suspenders of the urologic trade. I feel as if I’m walking around with a padded codpiece..”

    Keep getting stronger and listening you your wife.
    Best wishes,
    Alison

  • Jim Wilson

    It’s good that you’re writing about this in the non-medical media, Jeff. It’s one of the last taboos, despite the disease being so common. For years we couldn’t discuss the details of breast cancer; now everything’s out there. Likewise cervical cancer; now we have a vaccine. The more we can talk about these things, the more we’re likely to find ways to deal with them.

    • http://www.buzzmachine.com Jeff Jarvis

      Thanks, Jim. That’s the hope.

  • http://www.linkedin.com/pub/torsten-hoffmann-th-globalmediaconsult-com/0/b5/9ab Torsten Hoffmann

    Dear Jeff,
    that is good to hear. I wish you all the best for the healing process.
    Best,
    Torsten

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  • MikeD

    Jeff,
    Many will appreciate your detailed account.
    However, you got off lucky w/the catheter, following my prosectomy 9 years ago (un-needed it turns out) my catheter was in for 4 weeks. Following that I had to use a “vacuum pump” three times a day to simulate an erection in order to stretch my uretha to a reasonable length.
    Just wait until you get older and your urologist has to go in to stretch the scar tissue in your uretha.
    Good luck!
    I’m going to post a comment or your next post now.
    Mike

  • http://annerleydental.com.au Laura Annerley

    Thanks Jeff! Please keep writing, it’s inspirational to those who need it.

    Cheers, ~Laura.

  • http://hubpages.com/hub/Sometimes-Its-Scary-Being-a-New-Mom Amy Sanders

    I hope your doing better. I remember the first time I saw a foley get inserted, I just about passed out, I felt so bad for the poor guy.

  • http://www.walkwithoutpain.com.au Sandy Brisbane

    Hi Jeff – just looking at info about Foley catheters and saw your post. Good source of info for the blokes. My poor old dad has just had this op and has dementia. He pulled out his fully inflated Foley soon after the surgery and did himself a major mischief. Anyone have any suggestions for me to prevent a recurrence?