Tim Russert

I can’t possibly add more to the tributes to and memories of Tim Russert, except this:

Russert was a true pundit. Today, there is no more abundant resource than punditry; we all can broadcast our opinions and I celebrate that because we can hear the voices of the people. But a real pundit adds value to the conversation: perspective, facts, new viewpoints, intellectual honesty that come from research, reporting, experience, thought. Russert did that with fairness, seriousness, and joy. He always seemed to do it for the story, not the attention. All that cannot be said of another TV pundit I can name.

: Someone put up a tribute site to Russert on YouTube. Here is Conan O’Brien’s remembrance:

On Twitter, Brian Stelter pointed me to an outpouring of affection for Russert on Facebook. Here’s the wall to his fan page.

  • http://www.rossirant.com rossi

    it occurs to me that his death
    was sadly poetic
    as he went out in the midst of covering high intensity politics
    sort of like a war hero soldier dieing at war

  • Martha Stepanian

    It is hard to believe that he won’t witness the up-coming election he so looked forward to. He will be sorely missed.

  • http://aol Yasmin

    Tim Russert, the best in journalism will be sadly missed and remembered. His “Florida, Florida, Florida” chalkboard slogan is a momentum and will be remembered by many of us in Florida. He was a true lengent in journalistic politics. His style of journalism should be followed by many newscasters as he did it with true integrity, wisdom and most importantly was factual. My heart goes out to his wife, Maureen, son Luke and dad, known as “Big Russ.” America will miss you forever Tim!

  • Tim

    It’s terribly sad that he died, and shocking — we all think we are somewhat immune to death, thanks to medical science, so what a surprise it was to hear that a man as prominent and well-known as that died so suddenly.

    I did get a bit sick of all the mawkish tributes. I know cable channels have to fill airtime, but I long for the days when mourning was private and sentimentality was restrained.

  • http://meanbusiness.com smcnally

    This is awful. Of course as a human, son, father, husband, but this is awful for The News. Who else asks follow-up questions? who else doesn’t let ducked questions go (or at least let them go without making plain how lame the answers were)?

    He’s tough and tenacious yet civil and polite – I was just laughing at how embarrassed Tim got when Doris Kearns Goodwin repeated an LBJ line recently (“…rather have my enemies in my tent pissing out than outside my tent pissing in”) that got Tim blushing and calling for the Bleep.

    And, yes, he was truly enjoying this historic campaign. It’s too bad we won’t have his guidance as it plays out.

    Go, Bills! –

    just two weeks ago, I

  • Fred Edwards

    Early Sunday morning will not be the same. I could not wait to see whom he would grill next. He was hard hitting and fair. He will be missed!

  • http://buzzmachine connie ruth

    I was shocked on learning of his death Friday. What a wonderful man, always smiling, but beneath that smile the ability to ask just the right question at the right time. I’ll miss him. I understand his great love for his father, but there is no mention of his mother. Why?

  • http://www.vectorpedia.com Vectorpedia (Rick)

    Tim will be missed……….he was loved by everyone and a man of class and dignity

  • Colleena

    Tim was a special person that had an impact on modern politics that cannot be measured. He was the most trustworthy person involved in politics. Who can we trust now? Who’s words are going to reassure us when we are worried about our future?

  • http://brianrosenthal.tumblr.com Brian Rosenthal

    I too was shocked by his sad passing.

    As an aspiring journalist myself, I was struck by how objective and aggressive he seemed to be. He was tough on everyone- always equipped with a previous statement or fact to put the interviewee on defense and force them to answer the question.

    American political journalism will not be the same.

  • http://www.michaelcharton.com Michael Charton

    I watched the Meet the Press show this morning. That was tough. I also posted something for my worldwide friends on Michael Palin’s site and will post something on my blog http://tucsonmike.wordpress.com

    Michael Palin’s site is http://www.palinstravels.co.uk

    This is a blow to the American media and the average American citizen.

  • mary

    i watch meet the press show ever sunday morning drinking my cup of tea . politic is not something i really like but to see how tough and collective tim can get when interviewing someone important but he is a very nice person. i love when herd him talk about his upbring.

  • mary

    i watch meet the press show ever sunday morning drinking my cup of tea . politic is not something i really like but to see how tough and collective tim can get when interviewing someone important but he is a very nice person. i love when i herd him talk about his upbring.

  • Diana B.

    MY thoughts and prayers go out to the Russert family. My only question now is who is going to hold the politicians feet to the fire the way Tim did. Tim you will be forever missed. Being a Catholic woman I know that a much Higher Power needed you. So maybe your job has changed a little and the help you give from above will help us all.

  • http://www.mariadaveyphotography.com MariaDavey

    Tim was the best of the best……our prayers go to his family…….we will miss him

  • Julie

    More about a person’s character can be revealed by the kinds of questions that one asks than the answers that one gives. Tim Russert asked keen, intelligent and fair questions of each and every guest that appeared on his show irrespective of their political affiliation. His questions probed deep into the political forray which held the attention of political affecionados but were simply delivered so that the average American could understand and participate in the political discussion.

    It’s an unfortuanate but sad reality of today’s television personalaties that their character is devalued over the importance of celebrity. That certainly was not the case with Tim Russert. In spite of his personal success, his strength of character and convictions were the foundation upon what he later came to celebrated for. I am deeply sadded by the loss of Tim Russert. I felt that I could trust him to evoke defining issues that were the most important to listen to and think about. I will miss you, Tim. Thanks for all of your contributions towards making this nation great!

  • Barb Adams

    He was truly a icon in the news world. I found him to be a man with great integrity, sense of humor, and no matter what anyone thought….told it like it was with facts. My sympathy goes out to his family and friends. He will be truly missed because I always believed I could trust him to stand his own ground, even if it wasn’t the glitchy or popular view! I believe God has found another angel to bring up to watch over this great country. May he rest in peace!

    Sincerely,
    Barb Adams

  • Karrey Hanko

    I have been so sad since Tim has died. I will miss him dearly every Sunday when I sit with my coffee and watch “Meet the Press”. I am too Irish Catholic, have only one child who is a daughter. Tim’s relationship with his son Luke is the same as I have with my daughter Ashley. I only have one parent left who is my Mother, and just as he did, spend every ounce of time with my mother and daughter. My daughter too, is getting ready to graduate from college , which will be the proudest day of my life. My daughter and I call each other several times a day, we kiss each other whenever we see each other, I tailgate with her friends at football games. We have a very special relationship. My daughter and I both love politics which is one of her majors. I feel like I lost a brother when Tim died, I am just very, very sad for him and his family. May God bless them all. It will never be the same without him.

  • http://allen.copeland@sbcglobal.net Louella and Allen Copeland

    Our family would like to send our sincere condolences to the Russert family. Every Sunday morning ,before going to mass my huband and I looked at Meet the Press. Mr. Russert was a man of integrity,passion and honesty.He had a love of country and family and he displayed this love by asking the questions of the various politicians that he interviewed.He asked questions that were revelent to the issues that he felt all Americans should be able to ask of those that represent this country.We feel we were priviledged to have Mr.Russert in our home on Sunday mornings. We know he is in heaven organizing a celestial Meet the Press.Our prayers will be for your family. Sincerely the Copelands

  • Pat C.

    I was at work on Friday, listening to the radio, when the news came on and the reporter started talking about Tim Russert. I thought to myself … no, don’t say it. Then, of course, the reporter said that Tim had died. I cried at my desk, feeling such a sense of loss … for Tim’s family, for our country, and for myself. Of course, I didn’t know Tim personally, but felt like he was my trusted friend. I so admired his love of his family and his love of God. With all of his success, he never forgot his roots and never forgot what was really important in life. He lived his life with boyhood delight, which is something so many of us lose along the way. He was a man of intelligence, fairness, and great integrity … a real one-of-a-kind. My deepest condolences to Tim’s family and friends. He will be missed.

  • Suzie Stapleton

    I loved Tim. Every Sunday, I tried to get home early enough from mass to watch Tim on Meet the Press. When I didn’t, I would set my alarm for 3am Monday morning so I could catch the rerun of the show. I always felt better informed after watching Tim and his guests. I shall miss him. My whole family from Toledo, OH shares your grief – we shall miss his smile, wisdom, and presence among us. Our sympathy to his family, friends and colleagues at NBC.

  • http://aol Lori Nafis

    Rest With God Tim..It feels like I know you. I am from up state NY Utica. The love you had for your father and son is a true blessing to both of them. We all wll miss. Rest in peace…Lori Nafis

  • http://www.noexpertsneeded.com Louise Lewis

    My thoughts and prayers go out to Mr. Russert’s family and friends, and to all who seek healing in this moment. The “timing” of Mr. Russert’s passing was certainly not lost on me. It fueled my passion to continue encouraging people to have the “death bed” conversation with their loved ones now… before it’s too late.

    We tend to take the easy road through life. So I know it’s uncomfortable for some to think of saying goodbye to a loved one…especially to one of our parents … and especially to say goodbye before they age, get sick and pass away.

    From my own experience with having had the ‘death bed’ conversation with my Dad months before his sudden death, I can assure you of two things: First, wounds of the past can be healed; and secondly, having your say (before it’s too late) helps tremendously with your grieving process. The peace you will receive for having said all “those things” is beyond words. Personally, I think it also helps their passing as well.

    Why be left behind living with regrets?

    take care,
    Louise Lewis, Author
    No Experts Needed: The Meaning of Life According to You!
    Free copy at: http://www.noexpertsneeded.com

  • Andrew Waterman

    I miss Tim!!

    Who can I now count on to give me the results of honest unbiased research into the political issues today?

    I really miss Tim.

  • Sally Lyddy

    Tim Russert was part of our family and he didn’t even know it. We all felt a real connection with Tim. He, much like my late husbandTom of 1 1/2yrs. was Irish Catholic, an exemplary husband and father of 5, a true sports fan that played Div. 1 College football and baseball, Jesuit training throughout and an avid church goer on a daily basis. My husband, like Tim was thrilled with life, thrilled with his family, thrilled with our friends and our children’s friends that did well in life. He hurt terribly if something went wrong within the family or outside the family. He helped everyone no matter what. He was a very forgiving human being always had faith on his side. And so, this week has been yet another sad one for us. Not only did Tim remind us sooo much of our Tom, but we felt as though we knew him just as well. Sunday a.m.’s in our house consisted of Meet the Press and then off to church. I know that this is a very sad and difficult time for the Russert family and my prayers go out to them. And so I hope that Tom has finally met up with Tim and has welcomed him with open arms.

  • http://RussertIraqwarenabler Art Lueders

    Operation Mockingbird — Its Nestlings and Its Fifth Column

    Some Thoughts on Tim Russert et al

    I’ve already stated that Gerald Posner is a known asset of OM and is unquestionably on its payroll. Every muckraker worth his or her salt knows this is the case. He has been able to position himself quite close to a number of star TV talking heads, who have interviewed him repeatedly and eulogized both him and his books — books which have done no more than repeat the core of the fairy tale Warren Report and the pack of lies regarding the government murder of MLK.

    Chris Matthews, Dan Rather, and Tim Russert have been among the most passionate amigos of traitors such as Posner, which is to say they have been willing to receive whatever is fed to them via OM’s favorite conduits, and then to spend decades drumming packs of lies into the minds of the American people.

    It’s hard to say which propaganda campaigns have been most revolting, but I guess the fanatical enabling of 9/11 is the most appalling. The murder of 3,000+ makes it so. To keep the contents of my stomach subdued, I have routinely changed channels when any member of the above named trio shows his face on my TV screen.

    The sanctifying of Russert since his death has been especially unsettling to my digestion. The nausea has often arisen as I listen to one disgusting encomium after another by talking heads who know nothing about everything. [The same with the Republican devised Reagan funeral - Art l.]

    Justin Raimondo of http://www.antiwar.com apparently has been feeling similar waves of nausea over the endless sanctifying of Russert. I therefore, with great pleasure, pass along his recent comments on the same. And I must say, Justin does a pretty good job of expressing my own thoughts and sentiments.

    Footnote: more recent subscribers may not be all that familiar with OM. I suggest to them that they google their way to the congressional hearings on OM. The head of the CIA, William Colby, under oath, described OM in great detail, even including the going price for editors and reporters at the most prestigious media in the country! After Colby retired, he settled down to write his memoirs. The agency never forgave him for ratting out OM. When word got out he was writing his memoirs, that was too much. Colby soon thereafter committed ‘suicide’. The manuscript for his memoirs, which were almost finished, disappeared. The only remarkable facet of this tale is how long Colby had lasted before his old buddies offed him.

    June 18, 2008 http://antiwar.com/print/?articleid=13006

    Enough Already!

    The eulogies for Tim Russert ignore his role as the War Party’s sounding board

    by Justin Raimondo

    Enough already with the encomiums to Tim Russert, whose untimely death has sparked a veritable chorus of eulogies depicting him as the epitome of objectivity and the greatest of journalists. This is all coming, quite naturally, from his fellow journalists and intellectual gatekeepers, who share his prejudices, his politics, and – alas! – his shortcomings. It’s time for a little Russert revisionism.

    As Bill Moyers pointed out in Buying the War, his trenchant PBS documentary on how the War Party successfully sold us on the invasion of Iraq, Russert’s show was a favored venue for the administration to publicize stories they had planted in the media. Administration officials would get booked on Meet the Press and point to their phony reports as “proof” of Saddam’s WMDs.

    Remember back when Vice President Dick Cheney was going around making speeches in which he asserted that “we now know that Saddam has resumed his efforts to acquire nuclear weapons,” that this was not in doubt, and he knew it for a fact? Few were skeptical, and the New York Times came out with yet another Judy Miller “scoop” that seemed to confirm Cheney’s claim.

    Citing anonymous U.S. government officials, the Times averred that the Iraqis were engaged in a global effort to gather the means to make nuclear weapons according to a design that specifically included aluminum tubes. “And there,” says Moyers, “on Meet the Press that same morning was Vice President Cheney” citing Scooter Libby’s best buddy. Clearly trying to create the impression that Saddam Hussein already had nuclear weapons, or that he was well on his way to acquiring them, the vice president ticked off three elements essential to the construction of a nuclear device: technical expertise, a viable design, and fissile material. According to Cheney, the Iraqis had all three – and Russert just sat there, not challenging Cheney but actually cueing him:

    Cheney: “The third thing you need is fissile material, weapons-grade material. Now, in the case of a nuclear weapon, that means either plutonium or highly enriched uranium. And what we’ve seen recently that has raised our level of concern to the current state of unrest, if you will, if I can put it in those terms, is that he now is trying, through his illicit procurement network, to acquire the equipment he needs to be able to enrich uranium to make the bombs.”

    Russert: “Aluminum tubes.”

    Cheney: “Specifically aluminum tubes. There’s a story in the New York Times this morning – this is – I don’t – and I want to attribute the Times. I don’t want to talk about, obviously, specific intelligence sources, but it’s now public that, in fact, he has been seeking to acquire, and we have been able to intercept and prevent him from acquiring through this particular channel, the kinds of tubes that are necessary to build a centrifuge.”

    There were plenty of scientists in our very own Department of Energy who were warning the administration that this aluminum tube scenario was based on highly dubious “evidence,” but Russert, the alleged reporter, was too busy kissing Cheney’s butt to go out and find them. There were plenty of national security bureaucrats of one sort or another who strongly doubted the narrative Russert was allowing Cheney to present, unchallenged, on the most-watched political television show on the airwaves, but Russert didn’t know about them, and doubtless didn’t want to know about them at the time. In retrospect, however, Russert realized, at least to some extent, how badly he’d been used::

    Moyers: “Critics point to September 8, 2002, and to your show in particular, as the classic case of how the press and the government became inseparable. Someone in the administration plants a dramatic story in the New York Times. And then the vice president comes on your show and points to the New York Times. It’s a circular, self-confirming leak.”

    Russert: “I don’t know how Judith Miller and Michael Gordon reported that story, who their sources were. It was a front-page story of the New York Times. When Secretary Rice and Vice President Cheney and others came up that Sunday morning on all the Sunday shows, they did exactly that. My concern was, is that there were concerns expressed by other government officials. And to this day, I wish my phone had rung, or I had access to them.”

    As Moyers pointed out in his scathing documentary, some journalists – not a lot, but a few of the really good ones – “didn’t wait for the phone to ring.”

    Russert wanted to believe, as did the reporters and pundits who constitute the “mainstream” media, not only because this was the bipartisan consensus at the time, but also because of the incestuous relationship that often exists between journalists and the individuals whose doings they cover. The former are dependent on the latter for their bread and butter: if they don’t toe the line and deliver the right cues at the right moment, then they might not get that “scoop,” and – worse – they could soon find themselves frozen out of the information pipeline that runs through Washington like an underground sewer.

    Okay, so Russert was an enabler of the neocons, who allowed his vastly influential program to function as the War Party’s sounding board, but then again, so many were duped that it seems vindictive to emphasize this point so soon after his tragic death. Right?

    [More to the point, Franklin says he was the enabler of Peenack and he thusly became an enabler of the huge push toward making American into a neofascist state. I therefore say he was a neofascist fellow traveler.]

    Wrong. It wasn’t just his sycophancy in the presence of power that motivates my little exercise in Russert revisionism – it’s what was clearly his vehement hostility to anyone who challenged the status quo in any way and sought to provide an antidote to the Dick Cheneys of this world. Example number one: his disgraceful interview with GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul, the Texas congressman who made opposition to the war and our foreign policy of “preemptive” imperialism the linchpin of his remarkable campaign.

    In what has got to be one of the worst examples of high-handed hectoring and attempted intellectual intimidation I’ve seen in my lifetime, Russert tore into Paul the way he should have lit into Cheney, impugning his integrity, spending half the interview on the arcane subject of the Civil War – which Paul had never made a speech about, and obviously wasn’t even a minor issue in the campaign.

    When Paul raised the issue of U.S. intervention in the Middle East as fueling al-Qaeda’s jihad and support for bin Laden, Russert fell back on that old neocon canard: “So you see a moral equivalency between the West and Islamic fascism.”

    When Paul pointed out that Bush was intent on invading Iraq just as soon as he got into office, and his war moves had little to do with 9/11, Russert’s response was open hostility:

    “You mentioned September 11th; a former aide of yours, Eric Dondero said this. ‘When September 11th happened, he just completely changed,’ talking about you. ‘One of the first things he said was not how awful the tragedy was, it was, “Now we’re going to get big government.”‘ Was that your reaction?”

    How pathetic: Russert couldn’t be bothered to get on the phone and talk to even one of many CIA employees who were trying to counter the administration’s line of BS about Saddam’s alleged WMD, but he went and dug up the demented Dondero, a fool who has made a career out of gunning for the Good Doctor ever since he was fired from Paul’s staff. Now that’s American journalism at its best.

    Oh yes, Russert did his research, all right, but he only utilized it to the War Party’s advantage. He sucked up to power and was little more than a stenographer for high government officials whose confidence he coveted. He was, in short, a great journalist, at least by today’s standards, and that’s why the media blowhards are turning his death into a celebration of… themselves. Because they’re virtually all the same – shameless, sycophantic suck-ups who will do anything to advance their careers and could care less about where it takes the country. [I love the 'stenographer' metaphor!]

    The sad state of American journalism is why Antiwar.com was founded: it’s why we continue to provide you with the real news about vital issues of foreign policy, war and peace, and the myriad deceptions of our rulers. The “mainstream,” which is defined by its subservience to the powers that be, has simply abdicated its responsibilities, the execution of which are so vital to a free society. Few journalists exemplified this abdication more clearly and consistently than the late ringmaster of Meet the Press.

    Justin Raimondo

    End

  • Kristie Busch

    What a fella, what a force, what a “job well done good and faithful servant”. I am a regular citizen of this great country and I enjoyed and shall miss Tim the journalist, Tim the moderator and Tim the exceptional warm life loving human being.
    Surely, the angels of ‘Goodness and Mercy’ who follow us all the days of our lives were also along on that final trip and may we find peace in the knowledge that Tim is now with his Mom and the others who have gone on before us and to them it is just a twinkle of the eye before they see us again and to us it sometimes seems like a lifetime but, it will be in HIS perfect timing and we shall all be reunited.

    Kristie Busch

  • Justine Crawford

    I think this sums up the hypocrisy of public figures who say they are devout.

    Sully77 says:
    June 18th, 2008 at 4:51 pm
    Tim Russert’s life and death was acknowledged today and all under the auspices of being a devout Roman Catholic. He worked for two of the biggest proponents for killing unborn children and his hands unfortunately do have blood on them, along with the rosary so many people are fond of saying he carried. I will pray for him and his checkered understanding of our wonderful faith which at times can be a struggle to maintain – no one is sinless but some sins are not passed over with a visit to the Pope or a few well known people on this planet called Earth saying you are “a saint.” I wish it were that simple. If you are purporting to be a Catholic and conducting your life in the public eye under the guise of being a devout Roman Catholic then please try and get it right about the most important thing in the world – getting born! Nothing else matters. Nothing. Each person speaking today at his memorial service got that right given to them along with Tim Russert, so please afford that luxury to everyone else. Somewhere in New York, a little humble priest with skin cancer has prayed outside an abortion clinic for the past 15 years, whose death will not be televised or lauded and given accolades by public personalities. But under Senator Daniel Moynihan and Gov Mario Como, was imprisoned and threatened with fines for praying peacefully outside abortion clinics, he too carries a rosary in his hand.
    Thank God that God sees all.

  • Justine Crawford

    I think this sums up the hypocrisy of public figures who say they are devout.

    June 18th, 2008 at 4:51 pm
    Tim Russert’s life and death was acknowledged today and all under the auspices of being a devout Roman Catholic. He worked for two of the biggest proponents for killing unborn children and his hands unfortunately do have blood on them, along with the rosary so many people are fond of saying he carried. I will pray for him and his checkered understanding of our wonderful faith which at times can be a struggle to maintain – no one is sinless but some sins are not passed over with a visit to the Pope or a few well known people on this planet called Earth saying you are “a saint.” I wish it were that simple. If you are purporting to be a Catholic and conducting your life in the public eye under the guise of being a devout Roman Catholic then please try and get it right about the most important thing in the world – getting born! Nothing else matters. Nothing. Each person speaking today at his memorial service got that right given to them along with Tim Russert, so please afford that luxury to everyone else. Somewhere in New York, a little humble priest with skin cancer has prayed outside an abortion clinic for the past 15 years, whose death will not be televised or lauded and given accolades by public personalities. But under Senator Daniel Moynihan and Gov Mario Como, was imprisoned and threatened with fines for praying peacefully outside abortion clinics, he too carries a rosary in his hand.
    Thank God that God sees all.

  • E. McCloyen

    I was very much in shock when I learned of the passing of Tim Russert. My heart truly goes out to the family and all who knew and loved him. Even though I didn’t know him personally, I felt as though I knew him from the many times I’ve watched him on television doing what he loved best. He was truly one in a million. No one will ever fill his shoes. The presidential elections/debates will never be the same again. I’ve watched his son speak in the last few days, and Tim can be very proud. His son is going to go places. He is his daddy’s son….very intelligent and you can tell he too has a heart of gold just like his dad. God speed to the family. Tim, take your rest and do whatever work is required of you now up in the pearly gates. As your colleagues have referenced you saying, “Go Get “em.”

  • terry hamill

    Just wondering…Why do you think Tim and Maureen only had one child?

  • erick

    I know this may sound strange but I feel lost now…I looked forward to his insite into this up coming election, I looked forward to him having his guests on MTP and asking them the questions that we would ask our selfs. He was the best man I never got to know but with-in the past few days I got to know so well and became to admire even more. Right now NBC has a BIG hole and really have no idea how to replace it…and to be honest I hope they never do. He is an Icon and I will admire him for as long as I live.

    Sunday Morning will no longer be the same for me.

  • http://Wrightreal@aol.com Robin Right

    Our prayers and thoughts go to the Tim Russert family and fellow friends. Thanks, Tim, for all your contributions. Catch you on the flip side, pal. xo

  • http://none Joni Hanchett

    Tim represented what the people of Buffalo, NY stand for which is faith and family. He stayed true to the way her was raised and I am very proud of him. I know when he entered heaven God said job well done my good and faithful servant.

    Joni Hanchett

  • http://blowingintheether.blogspot.com LC

    Could not disagree more. He was a blowhard who, like the rest of the media punditry, was interested in politics only as a gossip game. And, along with the rest of the NBC cabal, he decided only 3 Dems. were “important” and when it came down to Hillary & Obama made it their objective to destroy the former and anoint the latter.

    I’ve never met the man and have no idea what he was like as a person, but to say, as Brokaw did, that he was the “pre-eminent” journalist of his generation is to illustrate just how low our standards have gone.

    The Daily Howler gets it right.

  • chris

    Tim Russert spent 54 of his 58 years striving to win his dad’s recognition, approval, and affection. Tim’s drive to excel and over- achieve ‘with the world as his witness,’ finally hears a muffled ‘I love you” from his Dad in 2004. Tim overcompensated for his own lack of paternal love (from his father) by worshipping his son beyond sound and reasonable judgment. Let’s pray that Luke Russert can adjust to being a regular person (like the rest of us) and not the man from Galilee. Shame on you Tim Russert for not dealing with your own issues before dumping them on the next generation. Also, no credit to your mother for your existence or upbringing? Who fed you, tutored you, disciplined you, washed your clothes, took care of you when you were sick, etc, etc, etc while Big Russ was M.I.A at his jobs? It seems that Big Russ got the better deal. Why not give Mom some credit? No mention of mom or your wife, Maureen. What gives?