With beans, please

It was thanks to Yelp on my Treo that I had a good burrito in Austin last night. Now if only it worked with GPS to find me the nearest burrito (having no idea of my damned zip code). Still, this is what mobile and local and the internet are supposed to be doing. Why’d it take so long? Why isn’t it there yet?

  • http://www.jayfallon.net Jay Fallon

    I started a project called Popcluster back in April ’07, whose basic functionality was to provide the mobile user with that type of data: good stuff within walking distance of the user.

    The main problem was that one would have to work with multuple carriers/operating systems to get a truly global product out, and the carriers have many security concerns. One company that is doing something similar is Socialight.

  • http://deleted Tansley – addendum

    I know you have to watch the cholesterol, but you really should try the Chimichanga more often than the Burrito. Just pop a lecithin afterwards…

  • http://dan.melinger.net Dan Melinger

    Thanks for the Socialight shout-out, Jay. (I’m one of the co-founders and a Jeff Jarvis fan :-)

    Yes – it’s been a struggle to get location-based services out to the masses in the US, but it’s finally happening. Half of mobile subscribers (those with the CDMA guys, Sprint and Verizon) already have GPS chips in their phones and the carriers are now slowly letting 3rd-party applications access them. If you’re not content to wait for the carriers, there are alternatives: get yourself one of the growing number of GPS phones for AT&T or T-Mobile, like the BlackBerry 8800 or Nokia N95 (we’ll have Socialight available for these soon) or you can even use/hack your wifi device, like my friend Dennis has done (photo taken at our offices)