County censors

The good news: They had wi-fi in the New Jersey jury room where I was serving (read: waiting). The bad news: It’s censored by our own government. I can’t get to my blog, Prezvid. And get this: When I click on the link to learn more about the censorship policy, they block me from seeing that page. And I just took an oath to uphold the Constitution. What about them?

  • http://deleted Tansley

    As you well know, Jeff, all jury trials in New Jersey are matters of National Security…

  • http://sethf.com/anticensorware/ Seth Finkelstein

    Hmm … this might be an interesting test. According to civil-liberties groups, censorware is difficult to circumvent, while according to the US goverment, censorware is easy to circumvent. So which is it? Can you circumvent it?

  • countertop

    Heh

    Your lucky

    I had a hearing to attend in Prince George’s County Maryland and they wouldn’t let me bring either my laptop or my cell phone into the court house because both had built in cameras.

    And I am a lawyer trying to represent my client!!!

  • Mumblix Grumph

    Do you feel that your civil rights would be violated if the judge tells you to not discuss your case over the weekend? Isn’t he infringing on your God-given right to gossip with your friends over brie and merlot?

    The ACLU lawyers can go back to headquarters…this is a false alarm.

  • http://blogspotting.net steve baker

    Interesting that Mumblix G. suggests that you want to gossip over brie and merlot. Would it be any different if the gossiping took place over pork rinds and beer? Or is the implication that the only people who complain about things like censorship are privileged and liberal elites who don’t have more important things to grumble about?

  • http://www.buzzmachine.com Jeff Jarvis

    But brie and merlot are so yesterday, I’ll bet only heartland conservatives nosh and imbibe it.

    I did not need access to discuss the case so, Mumblix, your argument is as leaky as a wine glass made of Kleenex.

    I do think there is a principle at work here: The county (or possibly the state) offers access and then decides what we can and cannot see. They prevent me from seeing and publishing to the sites I want. There can be no argument about children; children do not use the service. This is government censorship, pure and simple.

  • Uncle Fester

    You know, the censoring program is probably in place to keep the employees from wandering the Net, and the public is caught in the lockdown.

    Not that government employees would do that…..or private sector employees either.