Thus spake the editor

If you hang around Guardian people long enough — an hour or two — you’ll hear them quote or refer to the revered long-time editor of the paper, C.P. Scott. In particular, they quote his 1921 essay on the occasion of the paper’s centennial. After hearing it quoted again in Guardian Editor-in-Chief Alan Rusbridger’s Shorenstein speech (the post above), I finally got around to reading it and there is much worth quoting, so I will:

. . . A newspaper has two sides to it. It is a business, like any other, and has to pay in the material sense in order to live. But it is much more than a business; it is an institution; it reflects and it influences the life of a whole community; it may affect even wider destinies. It is, in its way, an instrument of government. It plays on the minds and consciences of men. It may educate, stimulate, assist, or it may do the opposite. It has, therefore, a moral as well as a material existence, and its character and influence are in the main determined by the balance of these two forces. It may make profit or power its first object, or it may conceive itself as fulfilling a higher and more exacting function. . . .

Character is a subtle affair, and has many shades and sides to it. It is not a thing to be much talked about, but rather to be felt. It is the slow deposit of past actions and ideals. It is for each man his most precious possession, and so it is for that latest growth of time, the newspaper. Fundamentally it implies honesty, cleanness, courage, fairness, a sense of duty to the reader and the community. A newspaper is of necessity something of a monopoly, and its first duty is to shun the temptations of monopoly. Its primary office is the gathering of news. At the peril of its soul it must see that the supply is not tainted. Neither in what it gives, nor in what it does not give, nor in the mode of presentation must the unclouded face of truth suffer wrong. Comment is free, but facts are sacred. “Propaganda”, so called, by this means is hateful. The voice of opponents no less than that of friends has a right to be heard. Comment also is justly subject to a self-imposed restraint. It is well to be frank; it is even better to be fair. This is an ideal. Achievement in such matters is hardly given to man. We can but try, ask pardon for shortcomings, and there leave the matter. . . .

One of the virtues, perhaps almost the chief virtue, of a newspaper is its independence. . . .

[The public] recognises the authentic voices of conscience and conviction when it finds them, and it has a shrewd intuition of what to accept and what to discount. . . .

A newspaper, to be of value, should be a unity, and every part of it should equally understand and respond to the purposes and ideals which animate it. Between its two sides there should be a happy marriage, and editor and business manager should march hand in hand, the first, be it well understood, just an inch or two in advance. . . .
To the man, whatever his place on the paper, whether on the editorial or business, or even what may be regarded as the mechanical side – this also vitally important in its place – nothing should satisfy short of the best, and the best must always seem a little ahead of the actual. It is here that ability counts and that character counts, and it is on these that a newspaper, like every great undertaking, if it is to be worthy of its power and duty, must rely.

Read it all.

  • http://www.mediangler.com haydn

    hmmm but they lose about $20 million a year (last year nearer $75 million) but as you say in your post theyhave profitable businesses that subsidise this so it’s a place where you can afford to be high minded. Some of itthough is illusory.

    Did you ask about conditions at those subsidaries? Conditions in this one that helped support the Guardian’s high mindedness were not so good.

    I still ask the question whether all that cosy stuff applies to their freelancers – the Guardian’s hand was forced over this some years ago when they tried claiming all rights – be interested in the situation now.

    If you go here you’ll see staff want to strike over pay, and there has been a recent case where a staff member injured by RSI have been refused access to company medical treatment.