Google v…i…d…e…o

Well, it’d be cool that Google is streaming the first episode of Everybody Hates Chris… if it worked. I’m getting one frame every 10 seconds. And it’s not my connection; CNN video is working just fine.

  • David

    Are old white guys even allowed to watch UPN?

  • http://www.blackrimglasses.com Ethan

    Why in god’s green earth would Google use Flash to do their video? How hard is it to do good quality video on the web? I’ve seen better quality from college kids using QT7 to do podcasts. The Apple stream from the Nano announcement makes this crap look like 1995 vintage postage stamp video, just bigger.

  • Arthur

    At 8:20pm it was working fine. Not the greatest quality, but acceptable, and no waiting.

  • http://swashbookler.blogspot.com/ swashbookler

    Watch out for the Google hit men, Ethan.

  • http://www.blackrimglasses.com Ethan

    Yeah, well… You would think that a company as proactive in being innovative as Google would be smarter with how they handled video. The codecs are there (H.264) and the player is there (QT7, MPlayer, VLC), so why not Google? It’s kind of like their lack of Mac support. Google’s extra-HTML initiatives are very generic and uninspired.

  • korutenshi

    No one has the market penetration that Flash player does, and video delivery with flash 8 reduces costs drastically with the lowest bitrate for the quality delivered. But thats not even the crux of what makes Flash an attractive delivery method. The capability of these self encapsulated applications allow different types of business models, branding and interactivity to be utitlized; and with a FLEX application server, those capablities can expand exponentially.

    While there may be better codecs out there for video, using Flash bypasses all that in favor of convenience for the masses, lower bandwidth costs for the provider and faster turnaround times for the developer.

  • korutenshi

    Here is the feedback from last month’s beta testing…
    http://www.macromedia.com/devnet/flash/articles/fl8_feedback.html

    I know that elearning will benefit tremendously from this…especially amongst all the SCORM groupies.

  • http://www.aboutmattlaw.com/p Matt

    I’ve actually been very impressed with this whole thing. The video is large, pretty clear, no waiting at all for it to start playing, no commercials and I’m watching a show right now that I wouldn’t have watched when(ever) it was actually on the box in my living room. I’m able to put the tech aside and I’m enjoying the show. Pretty cool.

  • http://www.tweblog.com Toby Getsch

    I love it. Simple. Quick. Variety. And on my laptop. Easy to see how this will grow.

    IPTV is very near, and this gets me as much or more TV than I want or need to watch – right now. I’m happy.

  • Marina Architect

    I’m watching a PBS Documentary on Bob Dylan about the 60′s music scene right now. It’s called “No Direction Home” and it’s directed by Martin Scorsese: check it out. Engaging.

    Here’s why I mention it, as I have my notebook out on my coffee table. Motion picture is too visceral a medium to be watched on a notebook in a chair during business hours and even less appealing after work. It has to do with sharing and physicality.

    As a Google supporter (they have earned my trust), I like this new development. As I’ve mentioned before though, streaming video holds low utility unless it is event based video: relevant political clips are a good viewing. I see video going the opposite direction toward HDTV and Studios including Independents will release films direct to HDTV on PPV. I guarantee this development as my own speculation. Pass on streaming (go short) and go long on HDTV.

    The exception is the wild card “Fiber to the Door”, streaming will be revisited once again in two-three years once this is viable. That’s when you go long. This current cycle will fail as it did in 2001.

    Siliconbeat.com recently broke a story that blew my mind. It was about a technology that downloads films to your mobile phone 24/7 as you go about your day. Transparantly! As you move about, it is downloading a DVD to your iPod nano for example. That’s something!

  • Ed

    I use Bloglines to read your site, Jeff, and the aggregator linked to a nice, big ad for Dell computers at the end of this entry.

    Just thought you’d like to know.

  • http://weblogs.macromedia.com/jd John Dowdell

    Jeff, I’m not sure why your playback is stuttering… here are some potential causes:
    – high server load at that moment, or congested network;
    – something else on the computer vying for processor cycles.

    I checked a few minutes of the Chris Rock piece yesterday, after hearing some “buffering” comments, but I couldn’t repro… was coming down smoothly each time I checked. For troubleshooting, I’d recommend seeing whether you’re still seeing problems now, and if so, whether it persists across a restart in a fresh session — fastest way to identify the cause.

    It’s more than the Chris Rock video, though… Google has moved their whole video service away from that custom player download and into Macromedia Flash playback.

    For Ethan’s “why!?”, check first at what Google says:
    http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2005/09/everybody-wont-hate-this.html
    http://blog.searchenginewatch.com/blog/050926-110504

    (It’s not enough to plan out a better codec, nor even to implement it — getting a capability deployed onto Other Peoples Machines is the harder task. Flash Video just works.)

    Video sidenote: The previous two versions of Macromedia flash Player included the Sorenson Sparc video codec, and 19 out of every 20 consumers tested can now immediately see such video without installing anything new. But for the past three weeks the new Macromedia Flash Player 8, which also includes the On2 VP6 codec, has been receiving record-high downloads… I’ve heard quotes of ten million download requests per day… so it seems you’ll be able to count on a higher-quality decompressor on your audience’s machines pretty durn soon. Amazing. 8)

    Regards,
    John Dowdell
    Macromedia Support

  • http://www.blackrimglasses.com Ethan

    Thanks for the response John.

    I’m not an opponent to Flash based video (quite the contrary, the company I work for’s business model depends on it), but I am a proponent of thinking future forward (and not LCD) with new things. For me, personally, H.264 video would make Google Video a killer-app. Flash based does not, even though it increases the ubiquity of it.

    And quite simply, I have a dual 1.8 G5 and it stutters on my display, and is pixelated. To contrast, the Nano keynote looks clean and plays clean. I’m running the Flash 8 player as well. I know from the beta that the new codec in Flash 8 will improve this, so I look forward to it.

    While Google TV is cool, it has not yet gotten to Killer App in my estimation, for the reason that torrents and high quality DIVX or H.264 will be my digital video distribution of choice. I think that if Google were to upscale to HD or even 480P SD quality video, it would be going toward a killer-app.

    But maybe that’s me being a video snob :)

    Ethan

  • http://www.projectnothing.com Nathan Lanier

    It’s working brilliantly for me. Quality could use a little work, but when I downsize the browser it’s alright.

  • http://airwave64.blogspot.com Frank Strovel, III

    It worked great for me as well. And the episode was really funny!

  • http://unbeknownst.net KirkH

    Worked here, maybe it’s your Dell laptop ;) VOIP is going that route too, Java is being used in place of bigger apps like Skype so you can make calls from any java enabled computer.

  • mark frenzel

    just look at some examples to see exactly where google is heading at: great quality, low bandwith, instant play, all platform support, most spread player (98%!!) ….

    Find some demos of the makers of the new Flash Player codec (On2-VP6):

    http://www.on2.com/video_samples/flix-video-samples/flash8gallery/?movie=taking_700

  • http://www.youtube.com/user/cataclysm9000 Sam

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