Posts from June 4, 2005

Bad Google

Bad Google

: Jason finds a site that blocks Google’s Web Accelerator and enumerates its evils. I didn’t like it either.

Giving a damn

Giving a damn

: Go read Seth Godin’s two posts on companies that don’t have to care and companies that care. This is also about an apparently inevitable shift companies and even industries go through: In Seth’s example, it is planes, trains and automobiles: airlines are the buses of today. They don’t care. See also FedEx turning into the Post Office of today because they’re thinking about their cost structure instead of their customers. See also Apple preferring to end up in court with its customers than in a community.

Used to be, our only defense against these companies that grow so big they con’t have to or can’t care anymore was to wait for them to go out of business and hope that another, better company rose from the ashes. But now — in cases where the product can be digital and not bound by atoms — we the people have the chance to build new and better competition. I’m working on a longer post on that: small is the new big. Later…

Asynch TV

Asynch TV

: We have a TV on a cable box in the family room and a TV without a cable box in the kitchen next door and in the morning and evening, they’re both feeding news. But suddenly, a few weeks ago, they went out of synch. The cable-box set’s is a good six seconds behind the direct-feed TV. What’s going on?

Two kinds of content

Two kinds of content

: Fred Wilson says that blogging software is the future of websites. I agree but added this:

I think it’s half the platform. The other is RSS. In the job I left yesterday, one of my undone projects was to convert the architecture of local news sites entirely to RSS: Everything is a feed. So a home page is a feed of latest and biggest stories. A town page is a feed of newspaper headlines, blog headlines, classified ads with the latest listings in the town, forum thread headlines, weather, and so on.

Looked at that way, there are two kinds of content in the world: reference (fed by wiki so it can be updated) and feed (rss, fed by blog software).

The former is lasting but needs to be updated; the latter — news, conversation — is timely and flows. Both need to be found.

So the next layer you need is how to get to the content. That has been navigation and taxonomy. It may — emphasis on may — shift to search and folksonomy. We’ll see.

: Oh, and, of course, it’s not just content. It’s conversation. Links are, obviously, the other means of finding the stuff we want: linksonomy.