The future of magazines?

The future of magazines?

: Mark Glaser has a roundtable discussion about the future of magazines with Jay Rosen, Joan Walsh, Nina Link, Samir Husni, David Abrahamson and me.

: Also, Heather Green called this weekend for a chat that ends up on her Business Week blog. I rambled (not thinking it’d end up as a transcript) but rambling is nothing unusual for me!

  • rcjordan

    Jeff, you should tell Nina Link to ease up on the ‘blinders-on’ marketspeak and read your comments in earnest. Time, guilt, physical clutter are recurring themes in the on-going demise of print.

  • http://journalism.nyu.edu/pubzone/weblogs/pressthink/ Jay Rosen

    Marketspeak is an excellent term for what she was offering. Also known as, “whatever it is, we are already doing it.”

  • http://www.phillyfuture.org Karl

    Hi – I’m just happy they included Salon in that discussion. I feel they are starting to get overlooked in these conversations and they have more lessons learned to share than almost anybody. They might be pigeonholed by being categorized as a “magazine”.

  • http://greg.org greg.org

    Is content-relevant online advertising ala Google (and Adsense placement across the entire web, next to the reader’s sought-after information, wherever it resides) doing to niche magazines’ ad revenues what Craigslist is doing to the newspapers’ classified ad revenues?
    And as I look at new consumer mags chock-full of “entry points,” blurbs and charticles, I have a hard time seeing how this high-minded “mags=long-form journalism” assertion can hold up. At least in a book with ads.

  • Buzz Burza

    As a Yank with a long involvement with publishing who retired from the fray in 1987, I know that the jury’s still out on the future of both magazines and advertising as we have known it. I’ve returned to South Asia where I was posted in the Peace Corps 1965-67. I assure you that the view from the other side is swell. To the unsettled state of the publishing industry, one now has to factor in the terribly unsettled state of the world. Sure gives one things to ponder.

  • Buzz Burza

    As a Yank with a long involvement with publishing who retired from the fray in 1987, I know that the jury’s still out on the future of both magazines and advertising as we have known it. I’ve returned to South Asia where I was posted in the Peace Corps 1965-67. I assure you that the view from the other side is swell. To the unsettled state of the publishing industry, one now has to factor in the terribly unsettled state of the world. Sure gives one things to ponder.