Posts from February 21, 2005

Keller of The Times speaks

Keller of The Times speaks

: NY Times Executive Editor Bill Keller spoke at Columbia on topics including blogs:

Keller

The rich get richer. Corollary: The famous get more famous.

The rich get richer. Corollary: The famous get more famous.

: Jeopardy all-time champ Ken Jennings has a Cingular commercial.

New

New

: Jonathan Weber, former editor of The Industry Standard, has a new site of local blog posts for the Western states.

Dialogue

Dialogue

: Patterico — who has been biting the butt of the LA Times for sometime — interviews Times opinion editor Bob Sipchen and blogs it. I don’t know whether Patterico will agree — I’ll bet he won’t — but I consider his history with the LA Times to be a success story in teaching big media to listen and not just lecture. When he pushed them on a big story against one Supreme Court justice of one stripe, they listened and published a story against another of the other stripe. A few weeks ago, they invited him to publish a piece in the Times about correcting the Times. And now he’s interviewing an editor. He’s still critical of the paper and that’s fine. But they’re talking. And that’s good.

What’s second prize?

What’s second prize?

: We’re in the hotel from hell in Philly: took hours to get in after check-in time; there’s a strange noise that sounds like every flush in the building comes through our rooms that went on all night (but, oddly, disappears in the); parking costs $31; at at 10p they tell us they ran out of blankets for our son’s unmade bed. Next time: The Four Seasons.

Anyway, blogging will be limted by tourism and sleep deprivation.

More about About

More about About

: Two damned good posts about The Times’ About deal: one from John Battelle and one from Jay Rosen.

: LATER: Simon Waldman of the Guardian also weighs in.

Trees rejoice

Trees rejoice

: The Washington Post sums up the woes of the newspaper industry.

“Print is dead,” Sports Illustrated President John Squires told a room full of newspaper and magazine circulation executives at a conference in Toronto in November. His advice? “Get over it,” meaning publishers should stop trying to save their ink-on-paper product and focus on electronic delivery of their journalism.

It’s not dead. But it’s not growing. And in an economy that demands growth, that smells like death.

The story has nothing radically news but it is a good sum of the state of the business. More later…

Gone-zo

gozno.jpgGone-zo

: Hunter Thompson commits suicide.

Thompson was really the first reaction to one-size-fits-all journalism. He was the argument that the grand shared experience of media in a three-network, one-newspaper-town world was actually bad because it was boring and institutional and inhuman. Thompson tried to inject humanity back into journalism. He injected it like drugs into his veins and, yes, sometimes it was a bad trip.

: LATER: At the Borders near here, they wasted no time putting up a sales shrine.