Posts from August 17, 2004

Exploding TV

Exploding TV

: A key issue for media — news and entertainment — is being able serve consumers where, how, and when they want to be served. It’s an issue not just for TV fun; it’s an issue for any form of information and media. But we’re seeing the issue start to bubble and boil in TV. See this from EDN.com (via Rafat Ali):

As broadband gets faster, storage gets cheaper, and home-networking products get smarter and more capable, video via the Internet will morph from a clumsy PC-based process into a painless remote-control operation. Video files might accumulate in a cache according to your predefined preferences, or improved compression might make an on-demand streaming approach more palatable. A PC might orchestrate the process, or you might buy a video server of some kind. You might sign up for programming subscriptions or choose programs one by one.

The details don’t really matter. The point is that video will flow into your home at your command, and your network will deliver it when and where you want to consume it. We’re a long way from that ideal today, but the trends are undeniable….

So to the content owners out there, please realize that exclusive deals no longer make business sense. It’s shortsighted to limit the market for your high-value programming to the population served by a single delivery mechanism. Along with a few hundred million of my closest friends, I’m willing to pay a fair price for your product, so please focus on making it available to me through whatever medium I prefer.

When did we Saudis stop beating your American wives?

When did we Saudis stop beating your American wives?

: It had to be the oddest advertising meeting since the intro of New Coke: Saudi Arabia starts a campaign of radio ads in America to convince us they didn’t help attack us. Not officially, anyway.

Stung by criticism about its role in fighting terrorism, Saudi Arabia has launched a radio advertising campaign in 19 U.S. cities citing the Sept. 11 commission report as proof that it has been a loyal ally in the fight against al-Qaida….

The ads don’t address commission criticism of Saudi Arabia, which the report called “a problematic ally in combating Islamic extremism.” It said Saudi-funded Islamic schools have been exploited by extremists and, while Saudi cooperation against terrorism improved after the Sept. 11 attacks, “significant problems remained.”

Here’s the Saudi press release. Here’s the text of the ads.

Stop the presses! Another blogging panel!

Stop the presses! Another blogging panel!

: During the RNC, P.S. 122 is holding… drum roll, please…. yeah, what the hell, cue the band, too…. a blogging panel. I’m on it. Don’t let that keep you away. Details here.

Change ChangeThis

Change ChangeThis

: Fred Wilson says I made a potshot at the launch of ChangeThis. Uh-huh.

I said that I don’t much like the concept. I don’t like the name — valuing change for change’s sake (why not ImproveThis?). I don’t like the attitude (“People are making emotional, knee-jerk decisions, then standing by them, sometimes fighting to the death to defend their position” — well, speak for yourself, people). I don’ t like the technology (PDFs are not interactive; they avoid conversation). I scanned the topics this morning and was unimpressed.

Now I’ve read the “manifestos” and I’m even more unimpressed:

: The Art of the Start is not a manifesto written for ChangeThis; it is an excerpt of Guy Kawasaki’s new book. It’s promotion. OK, that’s cool.

This is the kind of business book that makes high-altitude generalizations treating business as religion, or at least a cult:

There really is only one question you should ask yourself before starting any new venture: Do I want to make meaning?

Meaning is not about money, power, or prestige. It’s not even about creating a fun place to work. Among the meanings of

Gawked

Gawked

: Jessica Coen had a good first day on the job at Gawker. But Denton failed us: No good pictures.