Posts from July 7, 2004

The Daily Stern

The Daily Stern

: INCRIMINATING EVIDENCE: Ernie Miller tells us that the FCC plans to require broadcasters to retain recordings of broadcasts so they can go after them for indecency.

Don’t we have better things to do?

Blogging the convention

Blogging the convention

: Jay Rosen just got word that he is one of the bloggers credentialed to cover the Democratic National Convention and he writes about it today. Here’s hoping that the bloggers manage to find some real news in the real echo chamber.

: UPDATE: Dave Winer’s going.

Kos is going.

No surprises there.

The question is whether they had the balls to deliver some surprising credentials. Anybody have a list yet?

Oops

postedwards.bmp
Oops

: You have to give the NY Post points for its sense of humor. Here’s today’s page 1 after yesterday’s page 1 called Gephardt the veep. All corrections should be so obvious, eh?

Geek fashion report

Geek fashion report

: JC Penney is working on odor-eater underwear. How the hell do you market that: Don’t clean, just wear Penney’s panties? Yuck.

: The Today Show had on ladies wearing the TV screens on their chests today. Katie Couric said they were flat screens and then said, “Sorry, girls.”

Freedom of speech but not for ferners

Freedom of speech but not for ferners

: The U.S. is making it tough for foreign journalists to renew visas and is telling visitors on tourist visas they may not represent foreign media.

One heckuva way to demonstrate the power of the First Amendment, eh?

Two problems with this: First, foreign governments will retaliate against American journalists. Second, in this day and age, everyone is a reporter. Does this mean that a blogger over here posting about America is violating a visa?

I’m tougher on homeland security than most, but this is just stupid. We’re supposed to believe that freedom of information is a good thing, remember? [Thanks to Ernie Miller and Michael Froomkin]

Big and bigger

trackinggraph-06-2004.pngBig and bigger

: Technorati, as many will report today, just passed 3 million blogs tracked (our equivalent of 300 million burgers served) at a rate of 15,000 new blogs per day. Technorati founder Dave Sifry reports that of these, 1.65 million are updated actively, though Mary Hodder emphasizes that that doesn’t mean the rest are abandoned; blogs are used for many reasons (for example, for the once-a-year conference) and they still have information and value. At any rate, the conversations keep growing: Technorati is seeing more than 275,000 posts every day; three blogs are updated every second. The people are talking and the volume is growing.