Posts from May 29, 2004

Memorial

Memorial

: David Weinberger just sent me to the most amazing story of Cpl. Jason Dunham, a Marine who saved the lives of his fellow soldiers by throwing his helmet and body on a grenade.

Self-defense

Self-defense

: Chris Albritton, the journalist/blogger who just returned to Iraq, unleashes a long diatribe about how difficult it is to report in Iraq: the traffic, the security, the rules, the mistrust. He defends his journalist colleagues against accusations that they either aren’t sticking it to the man or aren’t reporting good news (“There isn’t much good news to report”).

OK, he’s there and we’re not. Better reporter than I, Gunga Din. But I think the diatribe misses two points:

First, because of all the limits he lists, don’t we need to acknowledge that we are not getting good reporting from Iraq? I don’t care about the reasons and excuses of which there are plenty. Let’s just take a cold, hard look at the quality of the reporting and see whether we’re getting the whole story.

Second, Chris, if I may suggest: Go talk to some of your fellow bloggers, Iraqi bloggers. You, of all journalists, should understand the benefit of their perspective — and reporting. Partner with them; show them some tricks of the reporting trade; quote them; introduce their story to mainstream Western media because no one else is. It’s the perfect bloggers’ scoop.

See my earlier post suggesting this to other reporters here and here. See Jay Rosen on this topic here and here. See also Thomas P.M. Barnett’s description, below, of Iraqi blogs as “serious ground truth.”

Harry Potter, R.I.P.

Harry Potter, R.I.P.

: The actor who plays Harry Potter predicts that his character will be killed off.

Images of sin

Images of sin

: Thomas Kielinger argues in The Observer that Germans can’t escape their history and shame all the more because there are so many images of their sin. Well, perhaps. There were fewer images of, say, the Soviet gulags and so there is less chronic memory of them. Still, the Germans’ relationship with history has more to do with the enormity of their crimes than their documentation, I’d say.

: See also this image from Normandy.

Bike nuts

Bike nuts
: Some amazing video of bikers holding a frightening drag race through traffic (and pedestrians) in New York. [via MediaDigest]

Busting out with pride

Busting out with pride

: Living in Europe (third post in a row) reports that Danish breasts are growing.

Yawn or vote

Yawn or vote

: The Party of European Socialists starts a European Parliamentary election blog “to counter voter apathy.” Oh, yup, with headlines like these, they’ll rush to the polls:

: “SAVING THE PLANET THE EUROPEAN WAY”

: THE SPIRIT OF SOCIAL JUSTICE GAINS GROUND

: THE WORLD NEEDS PRE-EMPTIVE POLICIES AND NOT PRE-EMPTIVE WARS

: FAIR DEAL FOR INTERNATIONAL WORK-SHARING

: MAKING EUROPE GOOD FOR YOU

: MAKING EUROPE AN EXCITING DEMOCRATIC ARENA

: RUMSFELD IS WRONG ON “OLD” AND “NEW” EUROPE

They need to read Wonkette. If they want to stir up excitement about politics, a little sex always helps.

Backlash

Backlash

: Living in Europe celebrates a German mea culpa for anti-Americanism:

Well, now, what have we got here? Why, it’s Andreas Rinke writing in today’s issue of Germany’s leading financial newspaper, Handelsblatt, and regretting the repulsive anti-Americanism that’s become the leitmotif of German discourse this past while.

His op-ed is entitled “Der gute Deutsche” (“The good German”), and in it Rinke takes his fellow citizens to task for their arrogance and their ignorance….

“It is with astonishing nonchalance that the ordinary German judges the moral deficits of the superpower,” Rinke writes. “Responsible for this, is a mixture of schadenfreude, political rejection and cultural arrogance.” The key graf:

“And that, by the way, is why it is so presumptuous to boast about the apparently better ability of the Germans at “nation building”. Here the torturing US soldier, there the school-building German army