Posts from March 22, 2004

The inside angle

The inside angle
MSNBC anchor Brian Williams is strip-searched — body-cavity, even. [via IWantMedia]

: And here’s the oops-it-was-a-joke correction.

Reverse publishing, we call it

Reverse publishing, we call it
: Nettavisen — a very good online-only newspaper in Norway (they started Netzeitung, of which I’m a big fan) — just pulled a very cool one-time marketing ploy: They printed a free and very wowy print edition of their online content to show off all the wonders awaiting readers online. PDF of the print paper here. [via E-Media Tidbits]

First, delink the lawyers

First, delink the lawyers
: Glenn Reynolds is back with the sage observation (from a lawyer) that it doesn’t look too productive to send lawyers gunning for bloggers.

Does this mean that it’s always a mistake to send lawyers after bloggers? I suppose not. But I have to say that so far that’s how it looks. The ill-fated Luskin / Atrios dispute, the New York Times / National Debate facedown, and now this [the case of John Gray and his degrees] all suggest that sometimes it’s better just to let minor things go by than to issue threats that give the subject matter a much higher profile than it otherwise would have had. At the very least, a polite message pointing out the error, and requesting a correction without threats and bluster, is likely to do more good, and generate far less blowback. Bloggers are, in my experience, quite willing to correct errors of fact, but not impressed with threats and bluster.

Still, there will be blusterers who will threaten. I still want to see all the blogging lawyers — and there are many — band together to offer education and support (about a legal aid society for bloggers that will at least respond to lawyer letters with lawyer letters on your behalf?).

New, improved

New, improved
: The new designer-blue Technorati is up (I’d been using the beta for a few weeks). It’s nice: cleaner with some new features Dave Sifry outlines here.

: In my regular ego checks to see how I rank on the Top 100, I have found this puzzling trend: The number of inbound blogs linking to me keeps going up, but my rank stays essentially the same of late (and I’m quite delighted with that rank, I should add) because everybody’s numbers are rising: The tide raises all boats. I’ll think I can beat Gawker if I hit, say, 1200 blogs and then we both get more and so does everybody above us.

So the question: Is this because Technorati is getting more and more blogs (11k per day) and the have the same links other blogs have? Is this a viral effect: links beget links and they do it proportionately?

Just curious.

Merci (I think)

Merci (I think)
: Wish I hadn’t quit French after sixth grade. Then I’d be able to read this post and know whether they mean it when they describe me as un blogueur ultra-c

MT, RSS and drafts

MT, RSS and drafts
: Does Movable Type publish draft posts in RSS feeds?

I thought not (and even tested that once when I caught some really odd things on Nick Denton’s RSS feed).

But this morning, Amy Langfield read the post below, which linked to her, on RSS via Bloglines. But I hadn’t posted it yet.

I often write drafts of unfinished posts (which I would not want published!) or I use a draft to cut-and-paste quotes for a later post or I will confess that I occasionally write posts the night before and post them the next morning (makes me look so damned efficient).

Anybody know what happens with drafts, MT, and RSS?

Is that your ego ringing?

Is that your ego ringing?
: All the time, I’m on the street and hear somebody else’s phone ring and I check mine (even though I should know it’s not my ring). Ego calling.

This morning I was listening to (surprise! surprise) Howard Stern and Courtney Love called his cell phone, which rang on the air. Howard has a Treo. I have a Treo. I grabbed my phone. I thought it was mine ringing.

I think that’s pathetic, but I’m not sure.

Type A tax

Type A tax
: You think it’s easy being a Type A? Well, it’s not.

So this morning, I was driving my kid to school with a project too big for the bus (in their minds, kids have standards for carry-on baggage stricter than the airlines’) and I needed (well, “needed” is pushing it) to go to Starbucks to get my coffee and who-know-how-old scone.

My kids hate it when I go to Starbucks (and my wife eggs them on) and so it’s my fault when they’re slow.

I run in this morning with not a minute to spare and, damn, I see a slow guy on the register. The slow guys are all the same: They have the look of “retired” corporate vice-presidents. Post Peter Principle. These are guys who had secretaries to run their lives for years and now they can’t chew gum and run a register at the same time.

I’m crazed. And it doesn’t help that everybody in front of me is putting in orders harder to make than weapons of mass destruction. It also doesn’t help that they ran out of coffee. Hey, fools, it’s Starbucks! It’s your whole job: making coffee. How can you run out?

Drip. Drip. Drip. Crazed. I’m crazed.

I have my money in my hands. I know how much the coffee and scone and Times costs: $4.66. I get my coffee in hand and shove the money at the VP of slow and dash out, figuring that I’d just tipped him 34 cents for slow service.

I get my kid to school on time. Life is fine.

And then, a mile later, in traffic — crazed again — I realize: I didn’t hand him $5. I handed him $10. I gave the Slowman a $5.34 tip for being slow.

Now I’m really crazed.

You’ll be glad to know that I drink decaf.