Kidnapped

Kidnapped
: This story in the Guardian said that gangs are kidnapping youth in Baghdad for ransom.

And now here’s an Iraqi blogger saying that his cousin was kidnapped and his uncle had to pay $20k to get him freed. Of course, there’s no way to confirm the story.

  • Extortion

    There’s also riverbend’s account of the kidnapping of her uncle on 2/13/04
    “It was A.’s best friend and business partner, S. He had heard from A. just a few minutes before

  • http://fayrouz.blogspot.com Fayrouz

    20K is a reasonable amount. My cousin’s father-in-law was kidnapped a few weeks ago. The kidnapped person is a rich person in Baghdad.
    They asked the family for 40K. Son of the kidnapped person told them he would only pay 15k and if they don’t want that amount, they could keep his dad for themselves.
    The matter is you have to bargain in situations like these. The kidnappers were happy with the 15k and his dad was released after his kidnappers received the money.

  • Ebb Tide

    How come that is looked at so calmly and people are not outraged by kidnapping???!!! That seems a very defeatist attitude and not the kind of thing tolerated by a civilized society!!!! As we say here, “What is up with that?”
    Is there time to put an anti-kidnapping clause in the new constitution???? Are some truths not entirely self-evident afterall?????

  • http://fayrouz.blogspot.com Fayrouz

    The problem is — as Riverbend and Sarmad mentioned on their blogs — some of the IPs are already corrupted. People can’t trust them, so they aren’t reporting these matters to the cops. That’s one reason why there are gangs still running on Baghdad’s streets.

  • Ebb Tide

    Fayrouz, I am really not happy to hear about the corruption continuing, and I am even sadder to hear that people are already giving in to kidnappers and treating it as a routine event. That is certainly not the goal of this entire enterprise… to have a lawless society preying on the civilians at will… the goal was to stop all that brutality. That is very bitter news because it tells a bigger story that the kidnappings, it says the people are continuing to live in fear and are accepting that as a reasonable outcome.

  • http://fayrouz.blogspot.com Fayrouz

    That’s exactly what’s happening. After years of living under brutality of Saddam and his two sons, people are still afraid for their lives.
    Under Saddam, people would be arrested for silly reasons. If their families were lucky enough and have good connections, they would get them released after paying a big bribe. Now, we have a new style of torture carried by the gangs.
    I really don’t know what the solution is.

  • extortion

    That’s one reason why there are gangs still running on Baghdad’s streets.
    Are the private militias and the gangs one and the same?

  • http://www.needlenose.com Swopa

    That is certainly not the goal of this entire enterprise… to have a lawless society preying on the civilians at will… the goal was to stop all that brutality.
    Unfortunately, the people who planned the war consciously decided to go in with less than half the troops needed to provide security after the war.
    And even those troops have largely pulled back to bases outside Iraqi cities, because the U.S. is trying to minimize casualties while Bush runs for re-election.

  • http://twistedspinster.com/ Andrea Harris

    Well, maybe if folks like you didn’t sit and whine about every single American casualty as if it were 100 per minute, then they wouldn’t have done that.

  • Ebb Tide

    There were hundreds of thousands of people in the Baath party, republican guard, special republican guard, etc., etc…. all told… so that is a HUGE portion of the country that used to be “in” and now is “out.” The people planning the war assumed that more of those people would jump sides and in fact, they haven’t. I don’t think all this violence can be from foreign insugents, although I am certain they are there…. it is almost like the former baathists (et. al.) have become a raging Mafia-type element.
    Time to replace L. Paul Bremer with Rudy Giuliani and send Kiruk (sp?) the former NYC police commisioner, over there.

  • http://www.needlenose.com Swopa

    Ebb T., Kerik was already over there, and he bailed out as fast as he could.
    Well, maybe if folks like you didn’t sit and whine about every single American casualty as if it were 100 per minute, then they wouldn’t have done that.
    What? Bush tailors his strategy in his Endless War for Freedom

  • http://twistedspinster.com/ Andrea Harris

    Are you sure you want to be that moronic? Ooops — too late, I see that ship has already sailed. Why do I bother, arguing with fools.

  • http://www.lesjones.com/ Les Jones

    Kidnapping isn’t an Iraq problem. It’s a problem in most third-world countries that lack either a despotic, iron-fisted regime or an honest, efficient police force. It’s notable in South America, where kidnapping insurance is available.
    One recent trend from a few years ago was the mini-kidnap. Instead of kidnapping a rich person, gangs would kidnap someone of modest means and move quickly to turn them over, pocketing only $100 or so.