Not reported here

Not reported here
: Times public editor Dan Okrent today tackles the not-reported-here syndrome at many news outlets. He explains: When somebody else breaks a big story, The Times wants to add its own reporting. But the result is sometimes that The Times doesn’t get around to printing the story at all, or buries it, and thus Times readers are ill-served.

I have a very simple suggestion for how to fix this. I hate to make weblogs the cure for everything including acne, but wouldn’t it be wonderful if The Times started a weblog with the sole mission of pointing to great reporting and big stories in all its competitors around the world (even including a few online competitors)? The Times edits the world for us. That’s what weblogs do. The Times’ kinda-sorta campaign blog is now unafraid to point to others’ campaign stories, at least in its right rail. Put two and two together and, voila, thanks to this new medium you would have a great new service from The Times.

: Also noted: Okrent breaks his format to give us one more item: a link to Slate’s comprehensive assault on The Times Magazine’s sex-slave story and the magazine editor’s response.

I consider that Okrent’s first blog post.

: Also noted: Okrent got a rave review from the right-wing WorldNet Daily.

  • Ebb Tide

    Isn’t that a little bit like “sending shoppers to Macy’s” or whatever that store was…. yes, you are serving your customer AT THE TIME, but aren’t you running the risk they’ll like the other store BETTER… or in this case, the other purveyor of news????
    I think it’s a bad idea, the Grey Lady should stay grey…. bah humbug.
    Just kidding, the more links the better.
    Look at how much better Howard Kurtz is since he started blogging, much better than his “collumn.”

  • Ebb Tide

    NYTimes Op Ed on Deaniancs:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2004/02/01/opinion/01SUN2.html
    [...]
    thousands of teenagers and 20-somethings have fallen hard for his campaign. They’re lucky. It’s a wonderful experience to lose one’s political heart for the first time, as did the college students who sacrificed long hair and beards to be “clean for Gene” — Eugene McCarthy — in 1968
    [...]

  • Jeremy

    Well, Mr. Okrent is perhaps bigger than anyone at the Times. Having invented rotissierre (sp?) baseball, he has a huge place in the history books. Can you say the same for the editor of the times? Or any of the reporters?