Posts from December 12, 2003

European leftists slime support Iraqi terrorists

scumbuckets.jpgEuropean leftists slime support Iraqi terrorists
: Medienkritik translates reporting from the German show Panorama exposing German “peace” groups raisign funds to support the Iraqi terrorists who are killing both soldiers and civilians.

In the spirit of peace, a number of groups have started a fund-raising campaign entitled

Taste

Taste
: Haiko Hebig picks weblog designs he likes. I know, mine is butt ugly. I’ll fix that… after I fix everything else in life.

New

New
: Finally added Hoder’s IranFilter and also Iran 4 Dummies to the blogroll.

Dear Mr. Editor,

Dear Mr. Editor,
: Elizabeth Spiers responds to NYT public editor Dan Okrent:

3. I was fascinated to learn that you were a

Gift time!

Gift time!
: I don’t run a pledge campaign. I don’t have a tip jar. But I do sell magazine subscriptions (for the greater good of showing how well this will work in weblogs!). The holidays are fast upon us. Buy a subscription to The Week. Stuff that stocking.

One more reason to buy: You can’t find The Week on newsstands anymore. Economics of publishing: It costs too much to distribute copies given the sales. So The Week is going almost 100 percent subscription. So subscribe!

News misjudgment

News misjudgment
: Zeyad tells us that there were reporters all over the anti-terrorism demonstrations in Baghdad. So why wasn’t the story all over our media?

When we were marching on Dec 10 I told Omar that maybe we didn’t need to cover the protests after all since it looked like reporters from all the major media agencies were doing so. As you can see in my pictures there were scores of reporters and cameras all over the place. And since the rallies ended in front of the Palestine hotel we thought that it would be impossible for the media to ignore this event. I felt a bit awkward walking along reporters carrying just a little digital camera while they had all the equipment.

The last thing we expected was to be the first to publish anything about the protests. It felt both good and awful at the same time. Good for scooping Reuters, AFP, AP, and other wire services and media stations. And awful for the people that depended on these services for their news. I’m telling you there were reporters from every station in the world at the demos that day and yet only a few mentioned them at all.

: Glenn Reynolds thinks I was a little tough on the Rocky Mountain News reporter who used the demonstrations as incidental background for the story of me-me-me-in-Baghdad. Naw. The reporter found the demonstration only because his translator happened to take him there. And once there, he should have spoken with the demonstrators. This was a good story and he didn’t have the nose for the news.

: See the rest of Zeyad’s post. And note that I should have gotten a larger memory card for the camera.

Anyone who wants to send cameras or supplies to Zeyad and the Iraqi bloggers, perhaps we should team up on a shipment. Leave a comment….

Domestic tranquility

Domestic tranquility
: Ben makes sure that Mena gets the credit she deserves.

The Times they aren’t a changin’

The Times they aren’t a changin’
: The New York Times pens a luddite editorial today decrying the spread of camera phones:

Now, among the many unnecessary features cluttering the new mobile phones are small digital cameras…. The ads suggest that the purpose of putting cameras in cellphones is to take photos and share them immediately by sending them over the airwaves to friends and relatives. But the real purpose is to sell minutes on your wireless service. Although no one really wants the return of the wall-tethered rotary-dial black Bell, there is something to be said for the days when a cellphone was just a cellphone.

Jeesh, and you call yourselves journalists.

Camera phones are, in fact, good for taking pictures of family and such and sending them to friends. Note the social trend, folks; they’re selling well for a reason; it’s the will of the marketplace.

But camera phones will also have an important impact on journalism as witnesses everywhere will be able to document what happens in front of their eyes. These pictures will better record news. They will find their way into newspapers. They will improve and broaden the witness of news. That is good for journalism.

Somebody go down the hall to the Times editorial board and turn over their calendar to 2003.

: They were inspired, no doubt, by this Times story about Chicago trying to ban camera phones in certain venues. TechDirt says — wiser than The Times — that this is going too far. Can we say, “freedom of speech?”