Posts from August 2003

If you can’t stand the heat, get out of France

If you can’t stand the heat, get out of France
: Mark Steyn on the incredible scandal of 10,000 dead from heat in France:

‘The US and British armies have entered the gates of hell,” thundered George Galloway last month. “Soon it will be 100 degrees at midnight in Baghdad, but there will be no respite from the need for full body armour.”

As usual, George was a little off. The gates of hell are on the p

Doubtful

Doubtful
: Many are pointing to this alleged space image of the U.S. during the blackout. I don’t believe it. Most of New Jersey, for example, had power and thus light. The dark dozen was not so clean and clear. I smell Photoshop. Calling Dr. Snopes.

Fox loses

Fox loses
: Franken wins:

“There are hard cases and there are easy cases. This is an easy case,” said U.S. District Judge Denny Chin, who added that the motion for an injunction was “wholly without merit.”

In lieu of flowers… throw da bum out

In lieu of flowers… throw da bum out
: In her obit, a dead Wisconsin woman’s heirs suggest donations to anti-Bush causes: “Memorials in her honor can be made to any organization working for the removal of President Bush.” The obit.

It’s as if somebody changed my underwear and I didn’t notice

It’s as if somebody changed my underwear and I didn’t notice
: Google just changed my toolbar without asking me or letting me know. Not evil, perhaps, but freaky and frightening nonetheless.

: Note the comment: I’m not alone. All over the Internet now, people are “freaking out” at the change. I’ll just bet some nervous Google user is right now worried that a worm did it.

Not smart, Google. I don’t like somebody else driving my car when I’m in the driver’s seat.

Back to business

Back to business
: One irony of a Schwarzenegger victory would be that personal peccadilloes may matter less. Arnold has essentially acknowledged all his, shall we say, human weaknesses; he mentioned womanizing on Tonight. Roger Simon says Hollywood heavyweights will start coming out with an army of skeletons from Arnold’s closet. Says Page Six:

Cybill Shepherd is freaked out by the prospect of the Austrian-born action hero in the executive mansion.

“That would be the worst tragedy in the history of California,” Shepherd hyperventilated to “Access Hollywood.”

“I think that we are the laughing stock of the world, with Arnold Schwarzenegger running [for] governor,” Shepherd said. “I think he’s a real hypocrite. I think he has a past that is going to come out, and I’m not going to mention what it is, but it’s not going to be pretty.”

I predict that things will come out — and they will make not one bit of difference; the voters won’t care and probably will expect such behavior from Arnold (and those throwing stones at him out of their own Bel Air glass houses). If the dirt flies and if Arnold wins, we’ll then have a womanizing, steroid-slurping, inhaling governor and that will make it harder to act shocked and offended the next time a mere politician or president is caught doing something human. And I think that’s a good thing, a damned good thing. We would get back to judging politicians on the basis of job performance, not morality (as if anyone ever thought politicians were moral anyway).

Subscribe to The Week — an ad

Subscribe to The Week — an ad
: Note that I’m shilling for The Week magazine with an ad on the right and a text ad every day.

I’m doing this for three reasons:

First, I like The Week. It’s a weblog without the links. It’s smart, informative, opinionated. I said that long before I met anyone from the magazine. (In fact, I blogged my tribute to the magazine back in June, 2002). But then I met the folks at the Week and I ended up liking them as much as I like their magazine.

Second, I’ve been suggesting to the people at The Week that they sell subscriptions on weblogs because it’s their perfect audience and — here’s the point — because webloggers can make money that way.

So this is a test: Can a weblog sell subscriptions to a magazine?

If it can, weblogs can sell other things.

And if it can do that, maybe a weblogger can actually make money.

It makes sense: This is a smart, engaged audience, highly targeted, a great environment for advertising.

So stack the deck. Fix the test. Buy a subscription.

It’s risk-free: Try four issues free; if you don’t like it, cancel. If you do, thank me.

[And, yes, I get a cut of the revenue. If this works, this offer will be open to other webloggers to also get their cut. So subscribe!] [/ad]

: Oops. I apologize for sticking that obnoxious text ad inbetween every post. I intended to put the obnoxious text ad only inbetween every day. So I’m a bad page coder. Don’t hold that against me. Don’t let that stop you from subscribing to The Week. (Sorry. Couldn’t help myself. I’m getting carried away with capitalism and the need to succeed.) If you subscribe, I promise I won’t use popups.

Reparations and racism

Reparations and racism
: I’ve long dismissed the fringe calls for reparations payments for slavery for many reasons — because the sins of the fathers are not the sins of the gerat-great-grandchildren, because many (perhaps most) Americans today are descended from people who came here after the Civil War (how do you determine who should pay and who should be paid?), and mostly because this feeling of entitlement via suit has to end somewhere: The logical and absurd extension of this, I’ve always said, is that the Jews should sue the Egyptians for reparations for slavery under Pharoah.

Well now, Via Memri, the service that translated Middle Eastern media, here is an absurd and sick twist on that: The Egyptian weekly Al-Ahram Al-Arabi interviewed Dr. Nabil Hilmi, dean of the faculty of law at the University of Al-Zaqaziq, who is working on a lawsuit on behalf of Egyptians in Switzerland against “all the Jews of the world” because, when they fled Egypt, they took with them gold and cooking utensils.

The theft was not limited to gold alone. The thieves stole everything imaginable. They emptied the Egyptian homes of cooking utensils. One of the women approached Pharaoh, her eyes downcast, and said that her Jewish neighbor [don't you mean "slave?" -ed] who lived in the house on the right of her house had come to her and asked to borrow her gold items, claiming she had been invited to a wedding