Worse than spam

Worse than spam
: Somebody I know just bounced my email to him with one of those “spam protectors” that forces me to click on something to prove I’m OK before I can send email.

Confidential to you-know-who-you-are: Nope. Not doing it. Pain in the butt. I’m not going to encourage getting scores of bounced messages like that from everyone I do know. I’m not going encourage my email being blocked and delayed. Nope. Not doing it. I tried to tell you something useful. But now you won’t know what it was.

  • http://site-essential.com/ Kathy K

    I’ll do it once. If I’m not on the let-through list after that, I stop mailing.
    I don’t use one of those myself but I can sympathise. I get about 25 spams a day on my domain account and about 150 on my yahoo account (the one that was never intended to be used as a spam magnet). The accounts I use as spam magnets get easily twice that.

  • http://www.heiferman.com heiferman

    note to self: put jarvis on my spam white-list

  • http://aprendizdetodo.com Prentiss Riddle

    A bigger flaw in C-R systems than the hassles they pose to individual senders is the obstacles they create for mailing lists, but I still wish I had one to protect certain high-profile addresses like “webmaster@myemployer.edu”. Addresses of that sort aren’t typically subscribed to mailing lists, and if we do have a few subscriptions it would be easy enough to split the widely-advertised and CR-blocked address from an unadvertised address just for mailing lists.
    Things are getting so bad that we’re considering eliminating those addresses entirely and permitting submission only via web forms. A C-R system, klunky though it might be, would be more user-friendly than just rejecting the e-mail outright.
    A question: is anyone out there working on an open C-R system? The ones I’ve read about are all proprietary.