Jump the Shark has jumped the shark

Jump the Shark has jumped the shark
: I’m listening to Jon Hein of Jump the Shark on Howard Stern and it has become so predictable: Every show has jumped the shark, Hein decrees, and then he complains about the show. It’s like listening to those drones who go on about the alleged golden age of TV: Nothing is ever as good as it was. Ditto Hein.

  • http://weisblogg.pitas.com marc weisblott

    The soon-to-be-shut-down Television Without Pity has also, uh … jumped the shark. What you’re saying about the credible cream rising to the top amidst the deluge of media consolidation and criticism is more and more apparent … it remains somehow reassuring that there are anarchic outlets for the vox populi to snipe back at producers, but that doesn’t mean anyone–save for the person whose work is under scrutiny–has the time and patience to wade through all the muck. Similarly, does anyone need to read dozens of Jayson Blair think pieces? It’s only stoked his own stock price in the process. (Prompting even more think pieces about *that*.)

  • http://world.std.com/~mmcirvin/ Matt McIrvin

    The thing is, he’s probably right. It’s not that there’s no good TV any more; good new shows come along every so often. But individual shows have a life cycle, and if they survive long enough they usually end up declining in quality. It’s not necessarily a comment on the medium as a whole.
    (See the late _Buffy the Vampire Slayer_ for a prime example: that show was one of the underrated masterpieces of TV around about season three, sporadically revisited that level of brilliance, and even had one or two solid episodes early this season; but it was barely watchable of late and it was definitely time to go).
    And, yes, the same is probably true of blogs.