Posts from April 2003

The prince and the pundit

The prince and the pundit
: Prince Charles on nanotechnology:

The prince has raised the spectre of the “grey goo” catastrophe in which sub-microscopic machines designed to share intelligence and replicate themselves take over and devour the planet.

I eagerly await Glenn Reynolds‘ response.

Persian v. Arab weblogs

Persian v. Arab weblogs
: Nima Arian (a commenter, below) points me to a post by Salam Pax expressing his jealousy over Iranian/Persian weblogs:

I am really jealous.

The First Persian Top Weblogs Competition

this blog won the second prize for blog design it has a a picture of an oriental tea glass. istikan chai dear?

when are we arabs going to have something like that? and why have persians taken to blogging so easily than arabs? why isn’t there a single arabic weblog? why?why?why?

Salam’s own will, I hope, be the first of many.

And Kurds and Turks and Jordanians and Palestinians and Saudis and on and on…

The World Trade Center Memorial

The World Trade Center Memorial
: The competition for design of the World Trade Center Memorial has opened. Find the rules here.

Designers must summarize their entire concept for the 4.7-acre site on one 30-by-40-inch presentation board, meaning that only high-concept (read: starkly simple) ideas can possibly win.

I am working on mine.

Rebirth: Iraq v. Japan

Rebirth: Iraq v. Japan
: Astigma, a Persian blog, sees parallels between Japan post WWII and Iraq post Gulf II. Japan developed technological prowess fast not by reinventing wheels but by reverse engineering existing technology. So, says Astigma, should Iraq reverse engineer democracy elsewhere in the world to succeed quickly. That is exactly the kind of help we need to give Iraq. To use another modern bizbuzzword, we need to implement best practices.

The arrest of Sina Motallebi, Day 8

The arrest of Sina Motallebi, Day 8
: Hoder has an update on the arrest of the Iranian blogger — a post that demonstrates the great complexity of life and politics in Iran.

Sina said to Iranian Students News Aganecy (ISNA) he was hopeful that the court was going to accept his explanations and even woudn’t take him to the court. He was worried that some people’s support, might make new problems and new questions for him in the interogation process. He sounded confident and calm, but as I said, worried. He talked to ISNA while he appeared in a court in Mehrabad Airport (!) for the first time after a week of being in costudy.

This is what makes it complicated in Iran, nobody really knows if his/her support would help the detainee or hurt him/her more.

More on the Baghdad Blog Daily

More on the Baghdad Blog Daily
: Glenn Reynolds points us to a piece of Slate’s David Plotz on the seven habits of highly effective democracy building in Iraq and one of them hammers the point I’ve been making lately about using the web — specifically weblogs — to foster free speech and a free press in Iraq:

5. Use new technology and media to instill the habits of democracy. Democracy is a learned behavior. The experiences of the former Soviet Union and Cambodia are evidence that democracy stumbles if citizens don

Who rules

Who rules
: This from the Reuters pool report on the meeting on the future of Iraq going on now:

There are clear differences among Iraqis on what role the United States should play, delegates say.

Some (mostly non-exiiles) want the Americans to have a direct role in the interim period to prepare for elections, because they don’t trust each other.

Others (mainly exiles) say only Iraqis should rule Iraq and the US should have less influence in the interim period.

Mustapha Qazwin, who lives in the United States, a sheikh and a doctor, said: “We are having healthy discussions between people inside Iraq and who were outside Iraq. This is a democratic process and we are still debating the best route forward.”

Suheil al-Suheil, a Baghdad lawyer, said: “There are differences over the role of the Americans. We here prefer the Americans to rule us in the interim period.”

Asked why, he said: “We are not ready to handle this yet. Saddam’s orphans are still alive.”

The nonexiles are the ones who are living the reality of Iraq.

Roses are dead, violence is you…

Roses are dead, violence is you…
: Michelle is holding a Saddam Birthday Poetry Contest.